Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 31st May 2017 22:51 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces

I wonder if these rugged aesthetics, now commonplace in cutting-edge websites, can work at scale - in mobile apps used by +1b people. Instagram's new UI paved the way: can this effort be replicated in other categories (e.g. gaming)? Is brutalism a fad or the future of app design? Would it make apps more usable, easy-to-use and delightful? To end with, would it generate more growth? Conversions experts sometimes suggest that more text equals more engagement - what if we push this idea to the extreme?

There's something unsettling about these brutalist redesigns by Pierre Buttin - but I don't outright hate them. There's something very functional about them.

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urk
by chrish on Thu 1st Jun 2017 12:05 UTC
chrish
Member since:
2005-07-14

I hate it, it offends my eyes, but! it seems to mostly return the "discoverability" aspect of good UI design that mobile abandoned years ago in favour of "simplicity".

I really wish someone would take all those decades of human computer interaction research and design a modern UI around those, instead of just making everything flat, removing most of the features, and hiding 75% of the remaining functionality.

Reply Score: 4

RE: urk
by kwan_e on Thu 1st Jun 2017 12:10 in reply to "urk"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I really wish someone would take all those decades of human computer interaction research and design a modern UI around those


How much of that research was tied to the technology we had then, though?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: urk
by The123king on Thu 1st Jun 2017 12:29 in reply to "RE: urk"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

I think you're fine if you start in the early 90's. Most systems could at least render 8-bit colour, which is plenty for a graphical interface. I mean, iOS 7 and up could get away with black and white. System7 did.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: urk
by Verenkeitin on Thu 1st Jun 2017 14:38 in reply to "RE: urk"
Verenkeitin Member since:
2007-07-01

"I really wish someone would take all those decades of human computer interaction research and design a modern UI around those


How much of that research was tied to the technology we had then, though?
"

Actually, none of it is tied to technology. For example, gestalt rules for good layout are the same regardless of screen resolution and size, and only a few colors can be used for meaningful color coding.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: urk
by Megol on Thu 1st Jun 2017 16:59 in reply to "RE: urk"
Megol Member since:
2011-04-11

"I really wish someone would take all those decades of human computer interaction research and design a modern UI around those


How much of that research was tied to the technology we had then, though?
"

Near 0%. Sure things have changed but not fundamentally - as the U part is a human and haven't adapted the hardware.

One example of then vs now is animations.
Then Mac OS animated some things to allow a user to use their spatial sense to link an icon to a window and also "distract" the user from the time it took to open the window.
Now animations are generally used to put some "polish" on the design without providing any actual advantage, no more information is provided, there is no use of the natural senses of the user to ease organization of data and animations tend to add extra time to operations instead of making them seem faster.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: urk
by ebasconp on Thu 1st Jun 2017 13:58 in reply to "urk"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

No trolling here, but, do you really find simple the UI that mobile phones provide nowadays?

I am completely lost on how to do simple things in my cell phone because there is no consistency among applications; I do not know what I will find when I tap the "|||" (please, rotate the thing in quotes 90ยบ) or what will occur if I do some gesture.

That lack of consistency is, IMO an effect of giving a lot of freedom to developers and designers to simply "create" what they think is beautiful instead of following standards.

At the end, the "brutalist" design addresses some of my concerns when removing all noise and showing just functionality, but the examples shown in that page do not show any consistency neither.

Probably I'm just getting older ;)

Edited 2017-06-01 14:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: urk
by chrish on Fri 2nd Jun 2017 11:33 in reply to "RE: urk"
chrish Member since:
2005-07-14

The modern trend is for "simplified" UIs, but that generally just means hiding things, removing clues as to what's a text label and what's a button, etc. The net effect is to make the UI much less usable... it's not simple, it's just obtuse.

Reply Parent Score: 2