Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Jun 2017 21:57 UTC
Apple

I'm not asking for an iPhone with replaceable RAM. I understand the value of a sleek, highly integrated, highly custom product. But if the most important and expensive part of the desktop computer you're looking to buy is the GPU, it's insane to choose one that's soldered to the motherboard.

Absolutely.

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So the argument is?
by leos on Wed 7th Jun 2017 23:09 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

The argument seems to be that they want Apple to make cheap hardware to compete with building your own PC box..

Sorry, ain't gonna happen, and has never been what Apple is about.

What's next? Someone complaining that the iPhone costs $800 and isn't it a shame that they can get an Android phone for $100 and why can't apple make a $200 iPhone?

The author says that they used to own Apple products but I doubt it. It has always been far cheaper to build your own PC boxes than buy Apple. The argument was as true 10 years ago as it is now.

Reply Score: 4

RE: So the argument is?
by sergio on Thu 8th Jun 2017 02:03 in reply to "So the argument is?"
sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

100% agree. Also, with Thunderbolt 3 you can connect GPUs using an external case. Apple will support these external solutions officially in High Sierra providing drivers for nVidia (they presented a Sonnet box, but any TB3 box with sufficient power to feed the GPU will do the trick).

In fact, in the Mac community, We've been using TB2 external GPUs for years, people complaining about these kind of things are usually PC fanboys, they don't give a shit about Macs and never will buy one anyway. xD

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: So the argument is?
by someone on Thu 8th Jun 2017 02:20 in reply to "RE: So the argument is?"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

The only issue with TB3 enclosures is the limited number of lanes available. Obviously, lanes in future versions of TB will get faster, but I doubt we will see a 16X external PCI express connection anytime soon.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: So the argument is?
by Alfman on Thu 8th Jun 2017 02:28 in reply to "So the argument is?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

leos,

The author says that they used to own Apple products but I doubt it. It has always been far cheaper to build your own PC boxes than buy Apple. The argument was as true 10 years ago as it is now.


I agree with your conclusion here, but the first statement seems a bit odd to me. Given the downward economic forces on the middle classes, it sounds perfectly logical to me that maybe he could be a former mac user who's been priced out, just as he claims.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: So the argument is?
by CaptainN- on Thu 8th Jun 2017 03:22 in reply to "So the argument is?"
CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

It doesn't have to be cheap - a Mac Mini with a PCI-Express slot, or maybe even the external GPUs they now support. $1000 isn't cheap btw.

And by the way, the iMac is cost competitive. Have you ever tried to make a similar system out of parts? You'll blow your budget on the 5K screen alone. It's not like they are a stranger to the idea.

Edited 2017-06-08 03:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: So the argument is?
by Alfman on Thu 8th Jun 2017 04:41 in reply to "RE: So the argument is?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

CaptainN,

It doesn't have to be cheap - a Mac Mini with a PCI-Express slot, or maybe even the external GPUs they now support. $1000 isn't cheap btw.

And by the way, the iMac is cost competitive. Have you ever tried to make a similar system out of parts? You'll blow your budget on the 5K screen alone. It's not like they are a stranger to the idea.


Yeah, but on the other hand you'll likely be plopping down large sums more frequently than with modular systems where you can upgrade/repair individual components. IMHO it makes sense to plan for upgrades, and it will save a lot of money over replacing the whole rig each time - even if you pay more for higher end components.


The other problem is being limited to a few models with hardwired components isn't very flexible. I think many pro users would be happy for the "grater box" Mac to come back. I've personally upgraded the same midtower for most of my life, haha. No such luck with laptops though.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: So the argument is?
by karunko on Thu 8th Jun 2017 07:50 in reply to "RE: So the argument is?"
karunko Member since:
2008-10-28

And by the way, the iMac is cost competitive. Have you ever tried to make a similar system out of parts? You'll blow your budget on the 5K screen alone. It's not like they are a stranger to the idea.

Why should I want to bleed my wallet on a 5K screen when I could get a great 32" 4K screen that gives me a much more useful pixel density -- for a fraction of the price?

Why should I want to buy a server class CPU (and the expensive ECC memory that goes with it) while there are kick ass desktop class CPUs that would be just as good for most workloads -- for a fraction of the price?

And no, I have no interest in pissing contests, so "just because I can" is not a valid answer for me.


RT.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: So the argument is?
by The123king on Thu 8th Jun 2017 08:04 in reply to "RE: So the argument is?"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

$1000 IS cheap when we're talking Macintoshes. The entry level ones still sell for $700

You'll never see Apple sell a "modular" Mac for less that $2500. They'd be cannabalising their own low-end market with a potentially high-end machine

Reply Parent Score: 2