Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 16th Jun 2017 22:50 UTC
ReactOS

ReactOS is participating in Google Summer of Code, and two of their projects have been detailed. Trevor Thompson is working on improving the NTFS driver:

When I started last year, ReactOS could read files from an NTFS volume, but had no write support whatsoever. After GSoC last year, the driver in my branch could overwrite existing files. I also fixed a few bugs in the driver's ability to read files, which have already been merged into the trunk. I also fixed ReactOS' implementation of LargeMCB's, which our NTFS driver has come to rely on, and which a few other filesystem drivers rely on.

My goals for this summer are simply file creation and deletion.

Meanwhile, Shriraj Sawant is working on adding taskbar features (more about Sawant in his GSoC blog post):

The current shell in ReactOS lets user manager running applications, start other applications and manage files but nothing more. This idea is about implementing 3 small shell extensions for showing the state of the battery of the machine, for ejecting usb devices and implementing the quick launch toolbar. These are important requirements and they are much needed while presenting ReactOS in real hardware. Not knowing the state of the battery or not being able to eject a usb flash drive is a serious usability problem. The shell extensions would be developed and tested to work on Windows.

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RE[5]: Comment by The123king
by galvanash on Sun 18th Jun 2017 18:09 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by The123king"
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

is the year 2017 - Windows NT was introduced with NTFS in 1993. 24 years -> no patents.


There are no patents to speak of. Microsoft didn't patent anything for NTFS. They simply protected it as a trade secret - you had to sign an NDA to view documentation of the file system internals. All the open source (or otherwise) implementations are reverse engineered.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[6]: Comment by The123king
by Megol on Mon 19th Jun 2017 17:14 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by The123king"
Megol Member since:
2011-04-11

"is the year 2017 - Windows NT was introduced with NTFS in 1993. 24 years -> no patents.


There are no patents to speak of. Microsoft didn't patent anything for NTFS. They simply protected it as a trade secret - you had to sign an NDA to view documentation of the file system internals. All the open source (or otherwise) implementations are reverse engineered.
"

Of course I know that. But reverse engineering a product is legal in most of the world. So patents would be the only reason to sue - which it obviously isn't.

Reply Parent Score: 2