Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 16th Jun 2017 22:03 UTC
Internet & Networking

It was almost four years ago I switched from webmail to a customized email configuration based on Notmuch and Emacs. Notmuch served as both as a native back-end that provided indexing and tagging, as well as a front-end, written in Emacs Lisp. It dramatically improved my email experience, and I wished I had done it earlier. I've really enjoyed having so much direct control over my email.

However, I'm always fiddling with things - fiddling feels a lot more productive than it actually is - and last month I re-invented my email situation, this time switching to a combination of Mutt, Vim, mu, and tmux. The entirety of my email interface now resides inside a terminal, and I’m enjoying it even more. I feel I've "leveled up" again in my email habits.

I'm fairly sure a number of OSNews readers use similar setups.

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LOL
by Kancept on Mon 19th Jun 2017 20:08 UTC
Kancept
Member since:
2006-01-09

FTA: "It’s been really nice to have all my email sitting around as nothing more than a big pile of files like this."

Our emails were individual files that we could mine for data in BeOS. Used it all the time. He's just now getting around to this.

Looks like everyone is going back to simplicity. Odd.

Reply Score: 1

RE: LOL
by CATs on Tue 20th Jun 2017 06:23 in reply to "LOL"
CATs Member since:
2017-06-09

FTA: "It’s been really nice to have all my email sitting around as nothing more than a big pile of files like this."

Our emails were individual files that we could mine for data in BeOS. Used it all the time. He's just now getting around to this.

Looks like everyone is going back to simplicity. Odd.

My first IT company that I worked in had corporate mail server that used same principle: 1 e-mail = 1 file. 1 IMAP folder = 1 folder on disk. You could either use e-mail client, or just browse your mailbox folder on server using simple file explorer.

Reply Parent Score: 1