Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 18th Jul 2017 16:12 UTC
Windows

A much faster, bare metal approach to deleting large and complex folders in Windows is via the command line. Of course, repeatedly having to navigate directories while executing commands via a terminal quickly becomes a tedious experience. In this post, I will walk through the process of creating a simple batch file and wiring it up to a handy right-click context menu from Windows Explorer to delete sophisticated directories in a hurry and without interruption.

Small tip (from 2015, so I'm a tad late), explained very well, that a lot of people could benefit from.

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Faster fastest delete
by Milan Kerslager on Tue 18th Jul 2017 18:17 UTC
Milan Kerslager
Member since:
2009-11-20

SHIFT+Del (it omits wastebin and it's fast)

However, delete files (directories) by moving every file one by one to the wastebin is not so smart... what about it Microsoft?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Faster fastest delete
by missingxtension on Tue 18th Jul 2017 18:41 in reply to "Faster fastest delete"
missingxtension Member since:
2011-01-14

Not fast enough, it's usually faster just to boot into windows pe or recovery console, it can save 10+ minutes sometimes. Just press shift+f10 to bring up a console.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Faster fastest delete
by avgalen on Wed 19th Jul 2017 08:03 in reply to "RE: Faster fastest delete"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

It's usually faster just to boot into windows pe or recovery console, it can save 10+ minutes sometimes

Usually faster? Only if you are going to perform 1 very longrunning task like imaging/restoring an OS.
Closing all your open programs, rebooting into PE, rebooting back into regular Windows, that takes a lot longer than most tasks would and you have a much more limited environment at your disposal.
The great thing about running in PE is that your are running without any virusscanner, indexing services and are running as "SYSTEM", but the use cases for this are rare and almost all related to largescale system maintenance

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Faster fastest delete
by CATs on Wed 19th Jul 2017 07:34 in reply to "Faster fastest delete"
CATs Member since:
2017-06-09

SHIFT+Del (it omits wastebin and it's fast)
However, delete files (directories) by moving every file one by one to the wastebin is not so smart... what about it Microsoft?

It's not 1995, no one uses "Recycle Bin" any more. Your comment isn't even related to the article.
Also, the "Recycle Bin" feature was implemented to allow careless users to restore files they delete "accidentally", which would happen quite often. And it was kinda smart in that regard.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Faster fastest delete
by avgalen on Wed 19th Jul 2017 08:07 in reply to "RE: Faster fastest delete"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

It's not 1995, no one uses "Recycle Bin" any more.
Also, the "Recycle Bin" feature was implemented to allow careless users to restore files they delete "accidentally", which would happen quite often. And it was kinda smart in that regard.

People still use the Recycle Bin in 2017 because they are still careless users that need to restore files they delete accidentally. This idea has been implemented in many products internally as well, from a "simple" Undo/Redo to actual recycle bins in mail programs, and multilevel (user/admin) recycle bins in tools like SharePoint, Exchange and OneDrive just to name a few

Reply Parent Score: 4