Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 18th Jul 2017 17:29 UTC
IBM

You may not know the Model F by name, but you know it by sound - the musical thwacking of flippers slapping away. The sound of the '80s office. The IBM Model F greeting the world in 1981 with a good ten pounds of die-cast zinc and keys that crash down on buckling metal springs as they descend. It's a sensation today's clickiest keyboards chase, but will never catch. And now it's coming back.

I used several of these growing up, and I've come to understand I'm the only one who didn't - and doesn't - like mechanical keyboards one bit - I find them tiring and way too loud. I want the thinnest possible keyboard with the shortest possible travel while still having a decent, satisfying, but very quiet click. I find Apple's Magic Keyboard is the exact right keyboard for me, but I also know I'll be one of the very few, especially on a site like OSNews.

Thread beginning with comment 646888
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Comment by leos
by leos on Tue 18th Jul 2017 22:02 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by leos"
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

No, its better in the same way that steaks tasted better 30 + years ago.


They didn't. That is your imagination and rose coloured glasses. The idea that you can accurately compare a taste now to a taste 30 years betrays a lack of understanding of how both the senses and human memory works.

Lower volume manufacturing, more attention to craft and careful consideration of feel.


Volume manufacturing and quality are orthogonal. For example, the quality of a car from a low-volume hand-made line is definitely worse than that of a machine made volume production vehicle.

They weren't engineered to be good, just good enough.


Some were engineered to be good as well.

Why spend more than you absolutely need to if the computer its hooked up to has a profit margin of $10.00 ?


There are tons of keyboards that are not bundled with computers that are available to purchase and your argument does not apply. Obviously the keyboard they throw in with your $200 Asus is going to be garbage. Not the point.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by leos
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Tue 18th Jul 2017 22:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by leos"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

They didn't. That is your imagination and rose colored glasses. The idea that you can accurately compare a taste now to a taste 30 years betrays a lack of understanding of how both the senses and human memory works.


No, its science. When meat was hung out longer, more good bacteria,mold,etc were able to grab hold and develop flavor longer.

Volume manufacturing and quality are orthogonal. For example, the quality of a car from a low-volume hand-made line is definitely worse than that of a machine made volume production vehicle.


In retrospect this is arguable. Obviously, for cars this is true, but for other products it really isn't.

There are tons of keyboards that are not bundled with computers that are available to purchase and your argument does not apply.

Uhm, yes it does? Not sure how saying it doesn't apply magically makes it not apply.

When an item is included in a purchase with a high margin, there is less pressure to cut corners on it. If its a stand alone product, then consumers are going to be more price conscious and seek the lower price. Just checkout the crappy crappy Cherry knock offs on amazon.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by leos
by leos on Tue 18th Jul 2017 23:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by leos"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

In retrospect this is arguable. Obviously, for cars this is true, but for other products it really isn't.


"Made in small batches" and "handmade" is mostly marketing. Certainly for a keyboard that is 100% suitable to volume and automated production and has absolutely no components that benefit from a human touch in the process.

Uhm, yes it does? Not sure how saying it doesn't apply magically makes it not apply. When an item is included in a purchase with a high margin, there is less pressure to cut corners on it. If its a stand alone product, then consumers are going to be more price conscious and seek the lower price. Just checkout the crappy crappy Cherry knock offs on amazon.


Now you're changing the argument. You're saying the included keyboards used to be better than they are now. Sure, I agree. Keyboards included with budget computers are so bad they are unusable.
That's not the topic though, we are discussing mechanical vs modern keyboard design. Not a mechanical keyboard vs a $1 bundled thing that came in the box.

Edited 2017-07-18 23:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by leos
by The123king on Wed 19th Jul 2017 12:35 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by leos"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

Volume manufacturing and quality are orthogonal. For example, the quality of a car from a low-volume hand-made line is definitely worse than that of a machine made volume production vehicle.

Not in every case. I believe there's a larger surviving percentage of Rolls Royce Silver Clouds on the road than Austin Allegros. The former being a low-production hand-made vehicle, the latter being a mass-produced machine-made vehicle. Both from roughly the same time period.

Some were engineered to be good as well.

And a large percentage were garbage. I don't see people clamouring over late 90's/early 00's Dell keyboards, or any keyboards bundled with a PC... I expect, mainly because they were garbage.

There are tons of keyboards that are not bundled with computers that are available to purchase and your argument does not apply. Obviously the keyboard they throw in with your $200 Asus is going to be garbage. Not the point.


If i'm not mistaken, the model F and model M's were bundled with IBM PC's. Come on, lets compare Apples to Apples.

Reply Parent Score: 3