Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 28th Jul 2017 19:49 UTC
AMD

So far all the products launched with Zen have aimed at the upper echelons of the PC market, covering mainstream, enthusiasts and enterprise customers - areas with high average selling prices to which a significant number of column inches are written. But the volume segment, key for metrics such as market share, are in the entry level products. So far the AMD Zen core, and the octo-core Zeppelin silicon design, has been battling on the high-end. With Ryzen 3, it comes to play in the budget market.

AnandTech's review and benchmarks of the new low-end Ryzen 3 processors.

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Comment by raom
by raom on Sat 29th Jul 2017 01:18 UTC
raom
Member since:
2016-06-26

I just want intel to make significantly faster processors for each generation again, like in the Nehalem days

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by raom
by Alfman on Sat 29th Jul 2017 01:59 in reply to "Comment by raom"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

raom,

I just want intel to make significantly faster processors for each generation again, like in the Nehalem days


I'd like that too, but unfortunately it seems we've reached the point of diminishing returns. The problem is that while having X times more speed is more useful than having X times as many cores, a tiny increase in speed will require exponential increases in costs, which consumers are reluctant to pay for. This is why chip vendors have shifted towards pushing more cores instead.

At the higher price points CPUs would have to compete with other technologies like FPGAs that are both faster and more efficient, so that's probably the direction the industry will be moving in once the scales of economy for those alternatives kick in.

Edited 2017-07-29 02:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by raom
by raom on Sat 29th Jul 2017 03:17 in reply to "RE: Comment by raom"
raom Member since:
2016-06-26

You mean x86 has been optimized close to as much as it can be done already? Is it not just intel being lazy due to no competition?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by raom
by _txf_ on Sat 29th Jul 2017 04:33 in reply to "RE: Comment by raom"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17


At the higher price points CPUs would have to compete with other technologies like FPGAs that are both faster and more efficient, so that's probably the direction the industry will be moving in once the scales of economy for those alternatives kick in.


FPGAs are not more efficient, at least not in such a way that one can state that without qualifying. FPGAs generally are less efficient as they have a lot of redundant hardware, hence why some will prototype on those to then develop ASICs. The advantage of an FPGA is the ability to retarget and massive parallelism.

Edited 2017-07-29 04:34 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2