Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Aug 2017 22:47 UTC
Microsoft

Multiple senior Microsoft officials told me at the time that the issues were all Intel's fault, and that the microprocessor giant had delivered its buggiest-ever product in the "Skylake" generation chipsets. Microsoft, first out of the gate with Skylake chips, thus got caught up by this unreliability, leading to a falling out with Intel. Microsoft’s recent ARM push with Windows 10 is a result of that falling out; the software giant believes that Intel needs a counter to its dominance and that, as of late 2016, AMD simply wasn't up to the task.

Since then, however, another trusted source at Microsoft has provided with a different take on this story. Microsoft, I'm told, fabricated the story about Intel being at fault. The real problem was Surface-specific custom drivers and settings that the Microsoft hardware team cooked up.

What a train wreck for Microsoft. Incredible.

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RE[4]: Comment by The123king
by Drumhellar on Tue 15th Aug 2017 19:50 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by The123king"
Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

If you don't see this, or the new 10 edition that will require extra money to install non store apps;


You mean the edition of Windows that is free to OEMs, with the cost to upgrade being on par with what a regular Windows license costs?

You know, the edition that many customers were SPECIFICALLY asking for leading up to its release?

Oh, so horrible of Microsoft to give people exactly what they ask for. I couldn't imagine a more nefarious move.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by The123king
by leech on Tue 15th Aug 2017 20:36 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by The123king"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Wait, what? People weren't asking for Windows 10 S. Maybe the OEMs were? But normal people certainly were not. I doubt the OEMs were, more likely some were threatening to go Linux 'cause it's free, so MS came up with S that is also free for OEMs, but you're stuck only using things from their app store, what customers would want that? There is a reason why Windows Phone failed...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Comment by The123king
by avgalen on Tue 15th Aug 2017 21:01 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by The123king"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

Wait, what? People weren't asking for Windows 10 S. Maybe the OEMs were? But normal people certainly were not. I doubt the OEMs were, more likely some were threatening to go Linux 'cause it's free, so MS came up with S that is also free for OEMs, but you're stuck only using things from their app store, what customers would want that? There is a reason why Windows Phone failed...

Normal people want software to come through the store. 1 central point to search/install/uninstall software and games that comes from a trusted/vetted source, doesn't break other software, doesn't add startup-/taskbar-/notificationarea-items or seperate updaters and just works.
My parents and most of my friends are such normal people and they are much happier with these systems compared to "tucows.com/download.com/random-googled-site-with-adware".
I am not such a person, so for me Home/Pro/Enterprise (and way too many other versions) are still available.
Not everything that comes from the store is a "phone-app", and if I have to install Itunes for someone I always choose the one from the store nowadays. It keeps my supporttime reasonable so I can geek out ;)
Windows Phone didn't fail because all software came through the store. According to that logic iOS and Android should have failed as well

All of that said, Windows S shouldn't exist. There is a switch in Settings->Apps->Apps&features that should be set like this as follows by default:
* Home: Allow apps from the Store only
* Pro: Warn me before installing apps from outside the Store
* Enterprise: Allow apps from anywhere
This would make it possible for everyone to be "secure" by default, but would still make it possible to add drivers that aren't on Windows Update, run a command prompt for troubleshooting and install those 1 or 2 programs that you want but aren't in the Store.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by The123king
by Drumhellar on Tue 15th Aug 2017 22:18 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by The123king"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

ChromeOS is becoming very popular in certain markets (education is a big one), and cost isn't the only thing.

All the things that make ChromeOS popular, Windows S is trying to replicate - management simple enough for a school teacher to administer a classroom of laptops, for example.

Closed ecosystem that prevents people from installing
whatever crap malware they come across (As in, no more installing 20 pieces of garbage along with your free crossword puzzle game) is also a plus.

They also released, at the same time, new management tools geared for schools with small IT departments (or nearly no IT department to speak of) for managing groups of these types of devices.

Schools want this. Hell, students want this - I see a lot of college students with Chromebooks, and Windows S is an attempt to offer the Chromebook experience.

People are buying Chromebooks. They're spending money on them over regular Windows laptops. That means they want them. Windows S is an attempt at providing the Chromebook experience.

Reply Parent Score: 3