Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 18th Aug 2017 10:41 UTC
Apple

Apple is adding an easy way to quickly disable Touch ID in iOS 11. A new setting, designed to automate emergency services calls, lets iPhone users tap the power button quickly five times to call 911. This doesn't automatically dial the emergency services by default, but it brings up the option to and also temporarily disables Touch ID until you enter a passcode. Twitter users discovered the new option in the iOS 11 public beta, and The Verge has verified it works as intended.

It's sad that we live in a world where our devices need features like this, but I commend Apple for doing so.

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RE[9]: What?
by fmaxwell on Mon 21st Aug 2017 10:33 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: What?"
fmaxwell
Member since:
2005-11-13

So, basically, same what I said: protecting regular citizens from the officers who should be protecting said citizens.

No, what you said was that "Apple is implementing a feature for criminals. Either that, or a feature to help regular people fight against the police and justice institutions."

I'm neither a criminal nor someone looking for a "fight against the police or justice institutions." I'm someone looking to protect my privacy and this feature helps me do it.

It also has another obvious function: It prevents criminals from using a victim's Apple Pay by forcing themr to put their finger on the sensor.

Edited 2017-08-21 10:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: What?
by Alfman on Mon 21st Aug 2017 12:31 in reply to "RE[9]: What?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

fmaxwell,

I'm neither a criminal nor someone looking for a "fight against the police or justice institutions." I'm someone looking to protect my privacy and this feature helps me do it.

It also has another obvious function: It prevents criminals from using a victim's Apple Pay by forcing themr to put their finger on the sensor.


I do understand what you are saying, but for people with such concerns I think it makes more sense to recommend not using fingerprint authentication in the first place. Your data would be safer just keeping the phone in password mode than assuming you'll be able to switch modes in time, especially since you may not be in control of the circumstances leading up to loosing your phone.

I suppose it's still better to have a biometric kill switch than not, I suppose, but it's still a risk.


As an aside, I always found biometric authentication very flawed. Firstly it's notoriously unreliable, in order to minimize false negatives, the more you have to accept false positives. Once someone has your biometric data, it's gone forever and you can't change it like a key or password. Add to this the fact that the more we depend on biometric authentication, the greater the chances of someone skimming it (think about the fake credit card skimmers, but for finger prints). Many people (whether they're criminals or not) will already have their biometrics on file (ie immigration, etc). For criminals, the greater the trophy, the greater the incentive for them to literally cut off parts of your body (hopefully not for a bloody iphone, but maybe for access to a bank account). Biometrics have long been used to tie people to crimes, but in a world where more people have our biometric data, the greater the chances of being successfully framed for a crime by imposters.

Reply Parent Score: 2