Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 29th Aug 2017 20:29 UTC
Gnome

Daniel Aleksandersen writes:

Jonas Ådahl from Red Hat has been busy adding new D-Bus APIs to libmutter. Mutter is the GNOME window manager and Wayland compositor. The two new APIs, org.gnome.Mutter.RemoteDesktop and org.gnome.Mutter.ScreenCast, expose a PipeWire stream containing the contents of the system's screens. The new APIs can create full-screen streams, or streams for individual windows. Only the former has been implemented.

These new APIs finally allows for services such as RDP and VNC servers and screen recording under Wayland. Once again, Mr. Åhdahl delivers! He has also created GNOME Remote Desktop, a new user-level systemd service daemon that is built on the new RemoteDesktop API in libmutter, plus VNC support from libvncserver. The new service can be used to connect up a remote VNC client to your local screen’s session. GNOME Remote Desktop appears to be a drop-in replacement for Vino server.

GNOME has been without its own Remote Desktop option since the switch to Wayland, and this work fills that gap.

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RE[4]: Yea!
by jessesmith on Thu 31st Aug 2017 01:29 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Yea!"
jessesmith
Member since:
2010-03-11

Keyloggers are also very easy to guard against with X11. If you're paranoid enough to be worried about someone logging your keystrokes you should also be paranoid enough to be sandboxing your X applications, problem solved.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Yea!
by ssokolow on Thu 31st Aug 2017 12:45 in reply to "RE[4]: Yea!"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Sandboxing isn't as easy as you make it seem.

For example, last I checked, Chromium/Chrome didn't work with the sandbox extension and it's just the most prominent example of somewhere you'll run into problems.

The point of Wayland is to break things once to fix the accumulated problems of decades. Requiring that applications play nicely under a sandbox is only one of those fixes.

Also, your argument devolves to security through obscurity because, if Linux becomes popular enough, keylogging it ceases to be a targeted activity.

Edited 2017-08-31 12:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2