Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 4th Sep 2017 22:20 UTC, submitted by Jaikrishnan
Android

Ars has a very detailed review - more of an in-depth deconstruction, to be honest, and that's a good thing - of Android 8.0 Oreo.

Take a closer look at Oreo and you really can see the focus on fundamentals. Google is revamping the notification system with a new layout, new controls, and a new color scheme. It's taking responsibility for Android security with a Google-branded security solution. App background processing has been reined in, hopefully providing better battery life and more consistent performance. There's even been some work done on Android's perpetual update problem, with Project Treble allowing for easier update development and streaming updates allowing for easier installation by users. And, as with every release, more parts of Android get more modularized, with emojis and GPU driver updates now available without an OS update.

Saving this one for tomorrow.

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RE: Great...
by r00kie on Tue 5th Sep 2017 09:32 UTC in reply to "Great..."
r00kie
Member since:
2009-12-10

Update modularity is nice and all that but the real question is if there will be any driver updates for the majority of devices.

Most devices are released and forgotten right away by their manufacturers, so nothing will change. Phones from google and maybe a couple other manufacturers may see updates outside large system updates, and that's good, but those were already receiving regular updates anyway.

This is a step in the right direction but it's not going to be the holy grail many people hope it will be.

Edited 2017-09-05 09:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Great...
by yoshi314@gmail.com on Tue 5th Sep 2017 12:18 in reply to "RE: Great..."
yoshi314@gmail.com Member since:
2009-12-14

from what i understand, this is not really an update.

it's more of "throw out your old stuff, and new one should be supported for longer from now on".

some devices may become updated to this release, but for many of them it will be more or less impossible.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Great...
by fmaxwell on Wed 6th Sep 2017 08:17 in reply to "RE: Great..."
fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

Most devices are released and forgotten right away by their manufacturers, so nothing will change.

Most Android devices are. Apple has an admirable record of long-term support and simultaneous upgrades for their smartphones and tablets. The current version of iOS (10) supports iPhones all of the way back to the 2012 iPhone 5. On the day of its release, it was available for every supported iPhone.

Android manufacturers appear to view product abandonment as a means of driving sales of new devices: If you want the new features and security fixes of the current version of Android, then buy our new smartphone.

Apple's closed ecosystem offers huge advantages in the development, testing, and deployment of OS upgrades. For consumers who view smartphones as essential tools for their lives, rather than as toys or hobbies, Apple's approach has a lot of appeal.

Edited 2017-09-06 08:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Great...
by jbauer on Wed 6th Sep 2017 08:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Great..."
jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06


Android manufacturers appear to view product abandonment as a means of driving sales of new devices: If you want the new features and security fixes of the current version of Android, then buy our new smartphone.


I doubt most people know or care. OEMs don't support their phones properly because it's far easier and cheaper than doing so.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Great...
by kurkosdr on Wed 6th Sep 2017 10:56 in reply to "RE: Great..."
kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

Most devices are released and forgotten right away by their manufacturers, so nothing will change. Phones from google and maybe a couple other manufacturers may see updates outside large system updates, and that's good, but those were already receiving regular updates anyway.

This is a step in the right direction but it's not going to be the holy grail many people hope it will be.


To be frank, I don't care if people who buy Galaxies and other "customized" junk will receive updates.

Will Project Treble result in Google phones getting upgrades from more than 24 months? Will Project Treble result in Google phones not being held hostage to Qualcomm's BSP (non)support policies? Then that's good enough for me.

Anybody who buys a "customized" phone knows what he is getting, but as of previous week, even if you went the Google experience way, you were still getting only a paltry of 24 months of upgrades.

Edited 2017-09-06 10:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Great...
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 6th Sep 2017 22:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Great..."
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Good question. Eagerly listening for the answer myself. Stupid 24 months of support make it absurd to buy anything but the newest phone when it is released. Which I'm sure all oems love.

Reply Parent Score: 2