Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 17th Nov 2017 11:51 UTC
Microsoft

Really, quite literally, some pretty skilled Microsoft employee or contractor reverse engineered our friend EQNEDT32.EXE, located the flawed code, and corrected it by manually overwriting existing instructions with better ones (making sure to only use the space previously occupied by original instructions).

This... This is one hell of a story. The unanswered question is why, exactly, Microsoft felt the need to do this - do they no longer have access to the source code? Has it simply become impossible to set up the correct build environment?

Amazing.

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tylerdurden
Member since:
2009-03-17

Most of the incompatibilities I have seen from old C code, and I have had to deal with ancient code bases at some jobs were mainly due to architectural assumptions. Other than that most of the old C code I'be seen it's pretty portable, there was not that much to the language after all.

Reply Parent Score: 4

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

Other than that most of the old C code I'be seen it's pretty portable, there was not that much to the language after all.


Was the old C code you've seen mostly written for Unix like OSes?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

DOS C compilers added all sorts of extensions to cope with things like segmented addressing, and well, DOS. Here's an old Dr. Dobbs article on that very subject: http://www.drdobbs.com/cpp/compiler-specific-c-extensions/184408821)

Reply Parent Score: 4