Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st Nov 2017 16:09 UTC
Android

Since the beginning of 2017, Android phones have been collecting the addresses of nearby cellular towers - even when location services are disabled - and sending that data back to Google. The result is that Google, the unit of Alphabet behind Android, has access to data about individuals' locations and their movements that go far beyond a reasonable consumer expectation of privacy.

Quartz observed the data collection occur and contacted Google, which confirmed the practice.

The cell tower addresses have been included in information sent to the system Google uses to manage push notifications and messages on Android phones for the past 11 months, according to a Google spokesperson. The were never used or stored, the spokesperson said, and the company is now taking steps to end the practice after being contacted by Quartz. By the end of November, the company said, Android phones will no longer send cell-tower location data to Google, at least as part of this particular service, which consumers cannot disable.

Raise your hand if you're surprised.

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RE[2]: [OT] Corporate doublespeak
by atsureki on Tue 21st Nov 2017 18:13 UTC in reply to "RE: [OT] Corporate doublespeak"
atsureki
Member since:
2006-03-12

Right, but that structure is for accountants and lawyers. It's strictly an on-paper, business-internal technicality. My complaint is how journalists are forced to play along with a straight face.

"Alphabet, Inc.'s Google", or similar phrasing, frames Alphabet as the established predecessor and Google as the new concept being introduced to the conversation in relation to it, which is precisely the inverse of reality.

If you were writing about another Alphabet subsidiary and wanted to draw the relationship back to Google, it would be appropriate to mention Alphabet. But if we're talking about Google and only Google, the pragmatically correct, non-Orwellian way to bring up Alphabet would be "Google, now a subsidiary of Alphabet, Inc.", which has the added benefit of being undisguised for the irrelevant PR boilerplate that it is.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

"Alphabet, Inc.'s Google", or similar phrasing, frames Alphabet as the established predecessor and Google as the new concept being introduced to the conversation in relation to it, which is precisely the inverse of reality.


No it doesn't. it states reality. Reality is Google is a child of Alphabet. That is accurate, no implication as to what came first can be derived by the current structure. All its meant to do is establish the current ownership structure.

Reply Parent Score: 2