Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 3rd Feb 2018 14:15 UTC, submitted by Drumhellar
Mac OS X

When users attempt to launch a 32-bit app in 10.13.4, it will still launch, but it will do so with a warning message notifying the user that the app will eventually not be compatible with the operating system unless it is updated. This follows the same approach that Apple took with iOS, which completed its sunset of 32-bit app support with iOS 11 last fall.

This is good. I would prefer other companies, too, take a more aggressive approach towards deprecating outdated technology in consumer technology.

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RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow
by BluenoseJake on Sun 4th Feb 2018 15:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by ssokolow"
BluenoseJake
Member since:
2005-08-11

I understand, it is good that Apple is giving you a chance to repurchase or just throw away software you've paid for.

Stupid Windows users, with their stupid being able to run software from 10 years ago.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by fmaxwell on Sun 4th Feb 2018 23:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
fmaxwell Member since:
2005-11-13

I understand, it is good that Apple is giving you a chance to repurchase or just throw away software you've paid for.

I understand, it is good that your car manufacturer is giving you a chance to repurchase or just throw away music you've paid for on cassettes and 8-track tapes.

Stupid Windows users, with their stupid being able to run software from 10 years ago.

Stupid Mac users, with their valuing performance, stability, security, and maintainability over the ability to run Jurassic apps.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
by Alfman on Mon 5th Feb 2018 05:04 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

fmaxwell,

I understand, it is good that your car manufacturer is giving you a chance to repurchase or just throw away music you've paid for on cassettes and 8-track tapes.




Apple may not wish to support 32bit software, that's their prerogative. But your analogy is a bit off. 8 track->cassette->CD is replacing one technology with a new & incompatible technology. This doesn't match the situation for x86 hardware, since 32bit->64bit is largely the same technology with new extensions (like larger registers). Some features like segments were removed, but these weren't generally used in 32bit code (they were used by 16bit DOS eons ago). One way to make your analogy more accurate would be for your car manufacturer to stop supporting audio CDs but to continue supporting MP3 CDs. In other words, the hardware is still physically capable of supporting the legacy format, but your manufacturer chose not to.


From an x86 hardware perspective the 32bit and 64bit components can't be fully separated because 64bit registers and mov instructions are an extension of 32bit ones and not a replacement! So even 64bit x86 compilers can still generate 32bit instructions/addresses/registers depending on the software requirements.

Here is a very brief overview:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/debugger/x...

Edited 2018-02-05 05:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
by BluenoseJake on Mon 5th Feb 2018 18:46 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

32 Bit software is not equivalent to 8 trax, or cassettes, but that's cool, if you want to pretend that it is.

Oh, and someone who uses both, Macs maybe slightly more stable than windows, but i hazard a guess that's more likely because of the locked down, semi obsolete hardware in most macs, not the ability to run legacy software. Windows has to run on a very complex and crazy mix of hardware, and there is lots evidence OS X er...sorry, macOS isn't designed to the same standard. It runs well on a very small subset of the pc ecosystem.

Edited 2018-02-05 18:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
by zima on Mon 5th Feb 2018 23:45 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Performance? Games typically end up with higher system requirements under macOS. Stability-wise there's no diff between OSes for a long time (and when there was a difference, MacOS was often worse than Windows). And as for security... RDF is strong with you, you already forgot howjust last year macOS provided full password hint or allowed admin logins without a password? Windows wasn't nearly as bad security-wise since the times of 9x (and MacOS Classic...)
And Apple had untill few months ago exclusively only a cruft of a filesystem, still has it as only option for HDDs...
Also curious how you "forgot" about iTunes bloatware.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow
by The123king on Mon 5th Feb 2018 11:16 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by ssokolow"
The123king Member since:
2009-05-28

You forget that 16bit apps were depreciated from Windows in every 64 bit verion of Windows that has been released

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Yeah, maybe that really started affecting people five years ago. So 1995-2015 I think twenty years is a good warning time to give people to migrate off a technology.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
by BluenoseJake on Mon 5th Feb 2018 18:48 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by ssokolow"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

But even today, you can buy a 32 bit version of Windows 10. That'll run your crusty old dos or 16bit Windows app. It'll go away eventually, but it exists right now.

Edited 2018-02-05 18:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3