Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 3rd Feb 2018 14:15 UTC, submitted by Drumhellar
Mac OS X

When users attempt to launch a 32-bit app in 10.13.4, it will still launch, but it will do so with a warning message notifying the user that the app will eventually not be compatible with the operating system unless it is updated. This follows the same approach that Apple took with iOS, which completed its sunset of 32-bit app support with iOS 11 last fall.

This is good. I would prefer other companies, too, take a more aggressive approach towards deprecating outdated technology in consumer technology.

Thread beginning with comment 653653
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[7]: Comment by ebasconp
by zima on Wed 7th Feb 2018 19:58 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by ebasconp"
zima
Member since:
2005-07-06

Yes, you're saying that more-than-x86 registers is fairly standard among CPU architectures and good to have - however I wondered if ...something in AMD64 strictly needs them to work. ;)

PS. While searching info on x32 I stumbled on https://wiki.debian.org/X32Port so it seems not only Gentoo that you mentioned toyed with it a bit...

Edited 2018-02-07 19:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by ebasconp
by ahferroin7 on Wed 7th Feb 2018 20:00 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by ebasconp"
ahferroin7 Member since:
2015-10-30

Ah, sorry I misunderstood you.

Strictly speaking, there isn't anything about 64-bit x86 that required them to be present (though they're established as an architectural feature now that you can't really get rid of without breaking most 64-bit code), though I will comment that the performance improvements they allow for have been a significant driving force for the adoption of 64-bit x86 systems.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by ebasconp
by Alfman on Wed 7th Feb 2018 23:14 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by ebasconp"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

ahferroin7,

Strictly speaking, there isn't anything about 64-bit x86 that required them to be present (though they're established as an architectural feature now that you can't really get rid of without breaking most 64-bit code), though I will comment that the performance improvements they allow for have been a significant driving force for the adoption of 64-bit x86 systems.


Ironically these x86 deficiencies probably helped drive the adoption of AMD64. For better or worse, AMD64 gave x86 new life. I know the market strongly favors wintel compatibility, but part of me would have liked to see x86 be replaced with a cleaner architecture. Clearly AMD64 is an improvement over it's x86 predecessors, but I do wonder where mainstream computers would be today if it hadn't succeeded? IA64, PPC, ARM, RISC-V, some other x86 variant?

Edited 2018-02-07 23:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2