Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Feb 2018 01:10 UTC
Intel

The most important parts of Intel’s new Vaunt smart glasses are the pieces that were left out.

There is no camera to creep people out, no button to push, no gesture area to swipe, no glowing LCD screen, no weird arm floating in front of the lens, no speaker, and no microphone (for now).

From the outside, the Vaunt glasses look just like eyeglasses. When you’re wearing them, you see a stream of information on what looks like a screen - but it’s actually being projected onto your retina.

This looks amazing. I'm not entirely sure if I, personally, have any use for this, but such basic, simple, handsfree information could be invaluable to, for instance, construction workers, farmers, police officers, or other people who do hard, dangerous work with their hands.

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RE[3]: Retinal projection
by Brendan on Thu 8th Feb 2018 01:39 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Retinal projection"
Brendan
Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

It's just a thought, maybe one day not allowing technology on tests will be considered Luddite ;)


How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?

- Brendan

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Retinal projection
by Alfman on Thu 8th Feb 2018 03:05 in reply to "RE[3]: Retinal projection"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Brendan,

How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?


Students still need to learn and surgeons would still need to be evaluated for competency, but why would it be a bad thing for them to learn and be evaluated based on the more realistic conditions that they'll see in the real world?

I think if they're denied the use of reference material on exams in medical school then there's a very serious risk that tests end up promoting the wrong skills and doctors will become proficient at memorizing answers for the tests but quickly forget it later on. I've seen it first hand how some people can get high grades by memorizing the answers and still be highly incompetent.

Arguably the best doctors will be the ones who can make the best diagnoses regardless of how they find it. To the extent that they're going to have access to technology on the job, then IMHO it makes the most sense for them to train and test with it so that finding answers among the mountains of knowledge becomes ingrained as second nature.


It occurs to me that I ignored the later part of your post "...because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?" and as such I may have answered a different question than the one you asked. Oops. I'll leave what I already wrote, but I do agree that everyone should do their own work! ;)

Edited 2018-02-08 03:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Retinal projection
by dpJudas on Thu 8th Feb 2018 04:38 in reply to "RE[4]: Retinal projection"
dpJudas Member since:
2009-12-10

Students still need to learn and surgeons would still need to be evaluated for competency, but why would it be a bad thing for them to learn and be evaluated based on the more realistic conditions that they'll see in the real world?

Sometimes it is needed to learn the basics of a subject before you can build on top of it. This is in particular important in math.

Those tests can rarely be realistic as usually the basics are automated in computer programs and tools. If you allow someone to google the solution they will often find the answer, but that doesn't mean they understand why the answer works or could create it from scratch.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Retinal projection
by kwan_e on Thu 8th Feb 2018 11:35 in reply to "RE[3]: Retinal projection"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?


Ben Carson (omg remember him?) proves that you can pass those tests and still not really be a good doctor, or intelligent.

Your example is actually a counter example to your point because it shows the assessment style is wrong for the job.

Surgeons, regardless of how well they pass exams, have to also demonstrate stamina and steadiness of the hand. Imagine how many people could be trained as surgeons if we assessed them based on how well they can perform long surgeries alone.

What we have now are overworked surgeons, because there aren't enough, leading to more and more mistakes, driving up insurance for both patient and surgeon, leading to even fewer people able to become surgeons. Surgeons already have a contingent of doctors and nurses working alongside, so what's one more person whose job is to know all the facts and can provide guidance during the surgery.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Retinal projection
by darknexus on Thu 8th Feb 2018 18:10 in reply to "RE[3]: Retinal projection"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?


Funny, you've just described education as it currently is, medical included. So I don't know, how do you feel about that?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Retinal projection
by Megol on Thu 8th Feb 2018 22:48 in reply to "RE[4]: Retinal projection"
Megol Member since:
2011-04-11

"How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?


Funny, you've just described education as it currently is, medical included. So I don't know, how do you feel about that?
"

I feel that you are wrong.
Ever spoken to a MD? They tend to know their shit and also understand how to apply their knowledge.

Before being put under ask your anesthesiologist what they use, how they use it, what they monitor and why and how they handle emergencies (allergic reactions, oxygen deprivation, heart problems++).

10+ years of training: know their shit.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Retinal projection
by Alfman on Sun 11th Feb 2018 22:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Retinal projection"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Brendan,

How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?


I just saw this news article, and while it's only tangentially related and not a response to you, it reminded me of the discussion we were having. Apparently doctors working for some private insurance companies and responsible for approving and denying coverage do not understand the medical conditions and do not even look at patient records.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/11/health/aetna-california-investigation...
During his videotaped deposition in October 2016, Iinuma -- who signed the pre-authorization denial -- said he never read Washington's medical records and knew next to nothing about his disorder.

Questioned about Washington's condition, Iinuma said he wasn't sure what the drug of choice would be for people who suffer from his condition.
Iinuma further says he's not sure what the symptoms are for the disorder or what might happen if treatment is suddenly stopped for a patient.
"Do I know what happens?" the doctor said. "Again, I'm not sure. ... I don't treat it."
Iinuma said he never looked at a patient's medical records while at Aetna. He says that was Aetna protocol and that he based his decision off "pertinent information" provided to him by a nurse.
"Did you ever look at medical records?" Scott Glovsky, Washington's attorney, asked Iinuma in the deposition.
"No, I did not," the doctor says, shaking his head.
"So as part of your custom and practice in making decisions, you would rely on what the nurse had prepared for you?" Glovsky asks.
"Correct."
Iinuma said nearly all of his work was conducted online. Once in a while, he said, he might place a phone call to the nurse for more details.
How many times might he call a nurse over the course of a month?
"Zero to one," he said.


Yikes! How do you feel about that?

Reply Parent Score: 2