Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Feb 2018 01:10 UTC
Intel

The most important parts of Intel’s new Vaunt smart glasses are the pieces that were left out.

There is no camera to creep people out, no button to push, no gesture area to swipe, no glowing LCD screen, no weird arm floating in front of the lens, no speaker, and no microphone (for now).

From the outside, the Vaunt glasses look just like eyeglasses. When you’re wearing them, you see a stream of information on what looks like a screen - but it’s actually being projected onto your retina.

This looks amazing. I'm not entirely sure if I, personally, have any use for this, but such basic, simple, handsfree information could be invaluable to, for instance, construction workers, farmers, police officers, or other people who do hard, dangerous work with their hands.

Thread beginning with comment 653683
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[4]: Retinal projection
by kwan_e on Thu 8th Feb 2018 11:35 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Retinal projection"
kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?


Ben Carson (omg remember him?) proves that you can pass those tests and still not really be a good doctor, or intelligent.

Your example is actually a counter example to your point because it shows the assessment style is wrong for the job.

Surgeons, regardless of how well they pass exams, have to also demonstrate stamina and steadiness of the hand. Imagine how many people could be trained as surgeons if we assessed them based on how well they can perform long surgeries alone.

What we have now are overworked surgeons, because there aren't enough, leading to more and more mistakes, driving up insurance for both patient and surgeon, leading to even fewer people able to become surgeons. Surgeons already have a contingent of doctors and nurses working alongside, so what's one more person whose job is to know all the facts and can provide guidance during the surgery.

Reply Parent Score: 3