Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd Feb 2018 01:08 UTC
Android

If I look back through all of the years we have covered Android, it’s hard to argue that the introduction of Google Play Edition phones wasn’t one of the biggest moments. In those early years, the Android skin situation was bad. Those early versions of TouchWiz, MotoBlur, and even HTC Sense, weren’t what many of us wanted, to say the least. We wanted Google’s version of Android, as well as their Nexus update schedules, yet that was tough to get because Google was making average hardware at the time.

While Google Play Edition may have failed as a program, I get the feeling that Android One will now act as a proper replacement to it.

Stop trying to make timely Android updates happen. It's not going to happen.

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moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

There is this thing called contracts, and legal requirements for device certification for accessing Google services.

If Google was actually serious about updates, they could enforce that outdated devices were ruled out of their servers.

I bet in no time OEMs would all start behaving.

Reply Parent Score: 4

kurkosdr Member since:
2011-04-11

There is this thing called contracts, and legal requirements for device certification for accessing Google services.

If Google was actually serious about updates, they could enforce that outdated devices were ruled out of their servers.

I bet in no time OEMs would all start behaving.


And Android would have lost the carriers' blessing and go the route of webOS or Windows Phone...

Reply Parent Score: 1

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

No apps, no phone.

It doesn't matter what OEMs come up with, if they don't run the apps everyone wants.

Reply Parent Score: 3

avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

And Android would have lost the carriers' blessing and go the route of webOS or Windows Phone...

1) you mean like iOS lost the carriers' blessing when Apple said "open the update floodgates"?
2) I don't know of any carrier that has ever blocked a Windows Phone update. Theoretically they could, but then the user could just use the "Over-the-cable Updater tool for Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows Mobile 10" (https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=56120)
3) Do you really think that carriers would block the OS that is running on 85% of their customers phones? And do you really think that instead of that 85% they would force OEMs to run OS-ses that only run on 0.x% of devices?

Androids update policy should simply be "the same is iOS"

Reply Parent Score: 2