Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 25th May 2018 17:21 UTC
Linux

Have you ever tried to install Minecraft and seen an error message like, "This application requires a Java Runtime Environment 1.6.0"? Or you try to install something on Windows, and you get an error that says some .NET framework is missing? Or, as a more basic example, have you ever spent a couple hours setting up a new computer with all your applications and preferences?

Those are the kinds of problems Docker, and "containers" more broadly (Docker is kind of the Kleenex of containers), are meant to solve. Docker makes it easy to install Linux applications on servers, along with their required dependencies and whatever preferences you might have for those applications. And, as an added bonus, conflicting dependencies between applications (maybe one app relies on Python 2, and another app relies on Python 3) aren't an issue, because everything is isolated in different containers.

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RE: Package managers
by grat on Sat 26th May 2018 04:49 UTC in reply to "Package managers"
grat
Member since:
2006-02-02

Also python is a bad example, as various versions of python are easily co-installable.


Easily, but not by system package managers. Setting up multiple python environments is not something yum, apt, zypper or pacman handle.

There are ways to do it, but they're *not* as easy as using the system package manager.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Package managers
by ssokolow on Sat 26th May 2018 05:44 in reply to "RE: Package managers"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Easily, but not by system package managers. Setting up multiple python environments is not something yum, apt, zypper or pacman handle.

There are ways to do it, but they're *not* as easy as using the system package manager.


While I agree there, you're not addressing the original quote that touched this all off. The original quote was:

(maybe one app relies on Python 2, and another app relies on Python 3)


That's literally as simple as sudo apt-get install python python3.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Package managers
by grat on Sat 26th May 2018 17:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Package managers"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

Sometimes. On a red hat 6 system I manage, yum suddenly stopped working one day-- It seems someone with sudo decided to replace the system python with python 3.

And this was a professional python developer. In theory.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Package managers
by Serafean on Sat 26th May 2018 12:49 in reply to "RE: Package managers"
Serafean Member since:
2013-01-08

paludis and portage support it just fine. I currently have python 3.4, 3.5, 3.6 all installed side by side, by the package manager. (also gcc-5,6,7, clang-5,6).
As I said: *good* package manager (with well written packages).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Package managers
by grat on Sat 26th May 2018 18:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Package managers"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

As has been mentioned, python is a bad example.

More important, however, is that custom environments is only a small fraction of why Docker is useful. See my more detailed response farther down.

I would describe containers as a lightweight method to rapidly construct and deploy a minimalist, isolated, environment for one (or more) application(s).

Try this with portage: Build an Ubuntu 14.04 environment to compile the Android Open Source Project OS in, without creating a VM.

Reply Parent Score: 4