Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 29th Nov 2005 19:18 UTC
Linux Linux desktops have always faced an uphill battle against Windows desktops. Now, OSDL is calling together architects from over two-dozen key desktop-oriented Linux projects to a Dec. 1-2 meeting at its headquarters to set strategic directions and standards, and find synergies amongst Desktop Linux organizations.
Thread beginning with comment 66737
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: What a laugh
by r_a_trip on Tue 29th Nov 2005 21:13 UTC in reply to "RE: What a laugh"
r_a_trip
Member since:
2005-07-06

Why all these packages, what I want I *a* package for *a* linux platform.

Then use aLinux ;)
http://www.alinux.org

All fun aside. You seem to be incapable of making a choice and sticking to it. When you choose one distro and standardise on that and stop having extreme updateritis (a half year old package is not that old), GNU/Linux is bliss.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: What a laugh
by on Tue 29th Nov 2005 21:37 in reply to "RE[2]: What a laugh"
Member since:

But what if that half-year-old package you talk about has bugs? What if the user has a genuine need for a new feature?

It's not down to "choice". It's down to the lack of any standards, binary compatibility or consistency, so few users can install the new KDE without all sorts of hiccups.

There are enough posts on this story saying the same thing, so why dismiss these users?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: What a laugh
by cr8dle2grave on Tue 29th Nov 2005 23:37 in reply to "RE[3]: What a laugh"
cr8dle2grave Member since:
2005-07-11

Linux isn't for everyone. Judging by your attitude, it probably isn't for you. Different strokes for different folks, eh?

Linux software installation *will not* change to be more like Win or Mac anytime in the near future.

Library incompatibilities will remain an issue. There are many technical reasons for this, but the most important one is developer resources. Designing and, more importantly, testing for backward compatibility is an ugly, time consuming, and unsexy task. FOSS projects are resource strapped and those resources they do have are better applied to fixing bugs and adding features.

Tht said, repositories with an installer which checks for dependecies, such as apt, are a very good solution with numerable advantages over the Win and Mac approaches, as well as a few downsides. One thing new user's need to accustom themselves to is that stepping outside of the official (or quasi official) distribution channel provided by your distro places you in experts only territory. Thus if you absolutely have to update or install an application which is not provided in your distros official repositories, you have a couple of choices:

1. Compile from source. Not exactly a black art, or even really difficult, but not exactly newbie territory either.

2. Hunt down an unofficial package which supports your distro/version. Anecdotal evidence is that this approach usually works just fine, but problems are possible and it is possible to completely ruin your OS install. Not recommended for newbies.

3. If neither 1 nor 2 will work for you, as you can't afford the time cost of educating yourself beyond the newbie class, then you're better off using Windows or Mac. Enjoy.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: What a laugh
by poofyhairguy on Thu 1st Dec 2005 03:30 in reply to "RE[3]: What a laugh"
poofyhairguy Member since:
2005-07-14

There are enough posts on this story saying the same thing, so why dismiss these users?

Because thats not some easy feature that can come out in the new Ubuntu or SUSE version like SATA support or the newest open office. What you ask for is magic- a complete change of how Linux is.

In Linuxland, what is best is what wins. You won't get what you want till one distro "wins" on the desktop (I say from an outsider not involved yet who will come and poor money in like never heard before- like IBM did on the server). Till then it is what it is.

I think its great because I don't worry about running the newest things. But is that is your priority then don't use any Desktop Linux. Just know that what you ask is not easy, and until users demanding it can give solutions instead of complaints things will stay like they are...

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: What a laugh
by on Wed 30th Nov 2005 08:18 in reply to "RE[2]: What a laugh"
Member since:

All fun aside. You seem to be incapable of making a choice and sticking to it. When you choose one distro and standardise on that and stop having extreme updateritis (a half year old package is not that old), GNU/Linux is bliss.

You are absolutely right. I am incapable of making a choice. Do you know why?
- Because distro A in recognizing my printer and not my mouse and distro B is recognizing my mouse not my printer.
- Because I like to play with the the couple Python/wxPython. Where can I find wxPython for my distro? The only updated and ready to use version I know is the Windows version. Debian (as an exemple) sticks with an older and buggy version. Compiling the package myself? to complicated for me.

You proposed alinux.org. Why not? I am pretty sure, in less than two weeks, I will have to face the same kind of problems I have with distro A, B, C, D...

I do not claim Windows is the system to use. At least, it is the OS that gives me the less problems (w2k). You see, nothing really new, I'm just a stupid user, who is not able to find a distro that suites his needs and just works out of the box. This year I spent a lot of time with "linux", in 2006 I will not.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: What a laugh
by archiesteel on Wed 30th Nov 2005 23:15 in reply to "RE[3]: What a laugh"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

- Because I like to play with the the couple Python/wxPython. Where can I find wxPython for my distro? The only updated and ready to use version I know is the Windows version. Debian (as an exemple) sticks with an older and buggy version. Compiling the package myself? to complicated for me.

Okay, you say you like to play with Python/wxPython, and then you say that compiling a package is too complicated? Unless I'm missing something, that doesn't seem to make much sense...

Reply Parent Score: 1