Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 19th Jul 2005 19:43 UTC
Windows Microsft has made hard statements about perfomance improvements in Longhorn. They claim that applications will load 15% faster than in XP, while boot time is decreased by 50%. They also claimed that Longhorn will be able to wake up from sleep in 2 seconds. Users should also expect half as many reboots during patching. Time to dust of those trustworthy stopwatches.
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RE[3]: We'll see... @zlynx
by deathshadow on Wed 20th Jul 2005 09:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: We'll see..."
deathshadow
Member since:
2005-07-12

>> So in summary, bad fonts are one problem the Linux alternatives don't have.

Even when you crank it up to do that though, it has a MAJOR problem with Kerning. Sure, each character is well formed, but if the spacing between characters is all over the place it kinda defeats the point.

Good example is to open up an editor and type the word "spacing" or "difficult", then go to the beginning of the line and start adding spaces...

and watch the character kerning jump all over creation.

I don't know what a "diffic ult" or "spacin g" is, apart from BAD kerning.

And to my eyes Cleartype looks superior to freetype with subpixel aliasing... ASSUMING you use the cleartype tuner.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: We'll see... @zlynx
by on Wed 20th Jul 2005 13:13 in reply to "RE[3]: We'll see... @zlynx"
Member since:

Even when you crank it up to do that though, it has a MAJOR problem with Kerning. Sure, each character is well formed, but if the spacing between characters is all over the place it kinda defeats the point.

Good example is to open up an editor and type the word "spacing" or "difficult", then go to the beginning of the line and start adding spaces...


Not on my system it doesn't. Works perfectly. In fact, I've not seem that happen on any modern Linux system.

And to my eyes Cleartype looks superior to freetype with subpixel aliasing... ASSUMING you use the cleartype tuner.

And I find the exact opposite to be true. ClearType produces fonts that are blurry, ill-defined, and have horrible colour bleeding. Freetype (assuming you have it configured properly) produces far more legible text on my system.

Could be a difference in the screen. I've seen laptops where Cleartype simply looks blurry, but I've seen others where it looks worse than it does on a CRT (and no, it wasn't configured incorrectly - it simply could not be made to work acceptably).

Reply Parent Score: 0