Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jul 2005 11:30 UTC, submitted by Jan Stafford
GNU, GPL, Open Source CIOs can gain competitive advantages by taking part in the open source revolution, a movement that will shake up the power structure of the IT world, said Julie Hanna Farris, the founder of Scalix. Farris explains why open source is not a fad and how it will benefit the business world.
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RE[2]: I'm amazed as usual
by on Thu 21st Jul 2005 17:10 UTC

Member since:

Of course. I'm talking about the "business" part of it, which is the argument of this article.

Yep, so what did you think of my reply a few comments ago? Cat got your toung?

For reference, here's what I wrote;

"Most of the closed-source and propriatory contracting companies I've worked for have went out of business or have stumbled from the glory days they used to have over the years. Come to think of it, most businesses -- software or not -- go out of business over a 10 year period. Singling out OSS sellers on this is a little harsh."

Reply Score: 0

RE: RE[3]: I'm amazed as usual
by TBPrince on Fri 22nd Jul 2005 00:21 in reply to " RE[2]: I'm amazed as usual"
TBPrince Member since:
2005-07-06

"Most of the closed-source and propriatory contracting companies I've worked for have went out of business or have stumbled from the glory days they used to have over the years. Come to think of it, most businesses -- software or not -- go out of business over a 10 year period. Singling out OSS sellers on this is a little harsh."

Of course, companies usually born and die. But if you look at Linux vendors (for example, since it's probably most exploited OSS product), how many of them exists and how many of them are actually making money?

At the same time, how many companies like IBM are exploiting Linux-coders work to make REAL money?

My complain is this is not as easy as 1-2-3 and about 10 years of OSS development didn't prove this is a successfull business model. 10 years are a medium period of time... enough to understand if things work or ot.

(Plus, I highly doubt about the whole point regarding innovation which needs to be proved as well.)

I really complain about people making things so easy when, infacts, they're not because many developers could be faked into thinking that this model works while this is far from being proven true.

I'm not discussing about OSS social value, which is fact. But the fact that OSS model has social merit doesn't mean it gives business values.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: RE[4]: I'm amazed as usual
by on Fri 22nd Jul 2005 02:33 in reply to "RE: RE[3]: I'm amazed as usual"
Member since:

Of course, companies usually born and die. But if you look at Linux vendors (for example, since it's probably most exploited OSS product), how many of them exists and how many of them are actually making money?

I haven't done a survey myself or seen one that was more than cherry picking. Have you? If so, gimmie the facts man...

At the same time, how many companies like IBM are exploiting Linux-coders work to make REAL money?

IBM is one player and they give as well as they take. If you know otherwise and have facts...

(Plus, I highly doubt about the whole point regarding innovation which needs to be proved as well.)

What point about innovation?

I really complain about people making things so easy when, infacts, they're not because many developers could be faked into thinking that this model works while this is far from being proven true.

It never works? Ever? Surely you don't assert that to be the case.

I'm not discussing about OSS social value, which is fact. But the fact that OSS model has social merit doesn't mean it gives business values.

Selfishness is the prime motivator. Are you saying that there are only social paybacks to open source usage and development in business?

If you are asserting all of this, it's an extreme position and I'd like some facts to back it up.

If not, please clarify since it doesn't seem to fit what I'm seeing.

Reply Parent Score: 0