Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Dec 2005 18:37 UTC, submitted by Robert Escue
IBM Unix isn't a flashy market. But what distinction there is has been going to Sun Microsystems lately, by making its Unix-based Solaris operating system available as open-source software. Last week, IBM moved to put its AIX Unix operating system back on everybody's radar by revealing plans to create a development center on its Austin, Texas, campus to speed up AIX development.
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RE[5]: One size fits all?
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:07 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: One size fits all?"
cr8dle2grave
Member since:
2005-07-11

_Of course it does. Look at what it did to commercial UNIX._

Efficient markets are a bitch. Compete or die.

_But the vast majority of the "global server market" running on Linux was never paid for in any way, shape, or form._

The "unpaid for" segment of the Linux market passes entirely under the radar screen. The measurable part of the market (the 35 billion dollar part) consists of that which is paid for.

_And that's the conventional justification for those in the U.S. who claim that outsourcing to India, China, Russia, etc. is good for our economy. It makes it easier for consumers to save a buck. And yes, it does make it easier for consumers to save a buck. But it also puts people out of work, and causes factories to close, and companies to scale back on benefits, and give paycuts, and sometimes even go bankrupt._

It is good for the economy. Perhaps not good for individual software engineers in the US (or widget welders in the rust belt), but good for the economy as a whole.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: One size fits all?
by Simba on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:11 in reply to "RE[5]: One size fits all?"
Simba Member since:
2005-10-08

"It is good for the economy. Perhaps not good for individual software engineers in the US (or widget welders in the rust belt), but good for the economy as a whole."

It doesn't matter how cheap things are if people don't have jobs and can't afford to buy them. A good economy cannot survive skyrocketing unemployment.

And I can't agree with turning a highly skilled occupation (software engineer) into a commodity where the average starting pay is less than the average starting pay for an apprentice plumber.

Edited 2005-12-21 00:14

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: One size fits all?
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:21 in reply to "RE[6]: One size fits all?"
cr8dle2grave Member since:
2005-07-11

_And I can't agree with turning a highly skilled occupation (software engineer) into a commodity where the average starting pay is less than the average starting pay for an apprentice plumber._

Guess what? Nobody has any choice whatsoever in this. Comparative advantage (a basic economic principle) simply favors pushing many forms of software development to areas with significantly lower costs of living (given that there is a sufficient level of education to make it possible). The only other alternatives are protectionist tarif schemes, which history has shown to give rise to market distortions with highly unfavorable results. Not to mention that it would be almost impossible to impose import tarifs on software, given the the ease with which digital products are distributed.

Reply Parent Score: 1