Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Dec 2005 18:37 UTC, submitted by Robert Escue
IBM Unix isn't a flashy market. But what distinction there is has been going to Sun Microsystems lately, by making its Unix-based Solaris operating system available as open-source software. Last week, IBM moved to put its AIX Unix operating system back on everybody's radar by revealing plans to create a development center on its Austin, Texas, campus to speed up AIX development.
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RE[7]: One size fits all?
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:21 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: One size fits all?"
cr8dle2grave
Member since:
2005-07-11

_And I can't agree with turning a highly skilled occupation (software engineer) into a commodity where the average starting pay is less than the average starting pay for an apprentice plumber._

Guess what? Nobody has any choice whatsoever in this. Comparative advantage (a basic economic principle) simply favors pushing many forms of software development to areas with significantly lower costs of living (given that there is a sufficient level of education to make it possible). The only other alternatives are protectionist tarif schemes, which history has shown to give rise to market distortions with highly unfavorable results. Not to mention that it would be almost impossible to impose import tarifs on software, given the the ease with which digital products are distributed.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: One size fits all?
by Simba on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:27 in reply to "RE[7]: One size fits all?"
Simba Member since:
2005-10-08

"Guess what? Nobody has any choice whatsoever in this."

Yes, they do.

"he only other alternatives are protectionist tarif schemes"

Which is a perfectly legitimate and appropriate response to the fact that a lot of these services are being dumped into the U.S. market at artifically low costs--which by the way, is illegal for U.S. companies to do because it violates anti-trust laws. So the playing field is not even level. Foreign companies are allowed to sell products in the U.S. at much lower prices than U.S. companies could legally sell them for even if they wanted to.

"Not to mention that it would be almost impossible to impose import tarifs on software, given the the ease with which digital products are distributed."

We should be punishing companies that outsource their programming. Not rewrarding them for saving money like we currently do.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: One size fits all?
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:35 in reply to "RE[8]: One size fits all?"
cr8dle2grave Member since:
2005-07-11

_Which is a perfectly legitimate and appropriate response to the fact that a lot of these services are being dumped into the U.S. market at artifically low costs--which by the way, is illegal for U.S. companies to do because it violates anti-trust laws._

Nonsense. "Dumping" may violate trade agreements, but you'll first have to demonstrate that such activity is happening. As far as I'm aware, there is no such evidence. It's simply far cheaper to employ software engineers in India and Russia than it is in the US. Lower costs, lower prices. That US engineering firms can't compete isn't evidence of dumping. And the anti-trust issue is a red herring as it only pertains under certain specific conditions to companies who command a monopoly position in a particular market.

Reply Parent Score: 1