Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Dec 2005 18:37 UTC, submitted by Robert Escue
IBM Unix isn't a flashy market. But what distinction there is has been going to Sun Microsystems lately, by making its Unix-based Solaris operating system available as open-source software. Last week, IBM moved to put its AIX Unix operating system back on everybody's radar by revealing plans to create a development center on its Austin, Texas, campus to speed up AIX development.
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RE[2]: addendum
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:29 UTC in reply to "RE: addendum"
cr8dle2grave
Member since:
2005-07-11

Rubbish. GM was already once bailed by the Federal Government back in the 70's in spite of trade legislation which was designed to protect their place in the market. GM should have been allowed to die a long time ago. In any case, my point stands: the median standard of living and aggregate wealth in the US is up considerably from where it was in GM's heydays.

Edited 2005-12-21 00:40

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: addendum
by Simba on Wed 21st Dec 2005 00:46 in reply to "RE[2]: addendum"
Simba Member since:
2005-10-08

"GM was already once bailed by the Federal Government back in the 70's in spite of trade legislation which was designed to protect their place in the market. "

You are thinking of Daimler chrysler. GM has never been bailed out by the government.

I'm going to assume you are not from the U.S., since you seem to have a very anti U.S. attitude. And most people in the U.S. do not think it is a good thing that our jobs are going overseas (although for obvious reasons, people in other countries would think it is a great thing).

Most people don't like it... Although at the same time, most don't do a damn thing about it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: addendum
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 01:02 in reply to "RE[3]: addendum"
cr8dle2grave Member since:
2005-07-11

I stand corrected. It was indeed Chrysler not GM. In any case, it's not particularly relevant. As I said, the point still stands. The US economy grew leaps and bounds in the 80's and 90's in spite of the removal of almost all protectionist trade schemes.

I am indeed from the US and, no, I'm not anti-US whatsoever. Reread what I've written. The US will be, on the whole, be a net beneficiary of large segments of the software engineering market going elsewhere. Cheaper software will provide more than sufficient economic stimulus to the economy over the long run to counteract any losses associated with losing programming jobs to overseas competitiors. And were US companies locked into using only more expensive US engineered software, they would suffer a competitive disadvantage relative to their competitors in other countries, which would have severe negative consequences for the economy as a whole.

I understand and sympathize whith those who are being displaced. Nobody likes to be "phased out", but it would extraordinarily foolish to sacrifice the viability and health of the whole economy to salvage one segment of it.

Reply Parent Score: 1