Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Dec 2005 18:37 UTC, submitted by Robert Escue
IBM Unix isn't a flashy market. But what distinction there is has been going to Sun Microsystems lately, by making its Unix-based Solaris operating system available as open-source software. Last week, IBM moved to put its AIX Unix operating system back on everybody's radar by revealing plans to create a development center on its Austin, Texas, campus to speed up AIX development.
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RE[11]: One size fits all?
by cr8dle2grave on Wed 21st Dec 2005 01:12 UTC in reply to "RE[10]: One size fits all?"
cr8dle2grave
Member since:
2005-07-11

You quite obviously have a very poor understanding of economic theory. Dumping may have been widely alleged, but it has rarely been proven. And it is almost impossible in theory to sustain such a charge in the case of something like software where the only tangible expenses are labor costs which will not rise in linear fashion along with a growing market. Engineering costs are rougly the same whether you have one customer or 100 million customers. And selling cheap on the expectation of thereby gaining a growing market share is a perfectly legal business strategy.

And you're simply wrong about anti-trust laws. Selling below cost is a common business practice in tight commodity markets. Ever heard of a loss leader? Or perhaps you'd care to quote the relevant parts of the Sherman/Clayton acts, or relevant case law, which would demonstrate otherwise.

Edited 2005-12-21 01:15

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[12]: One size fits all?
by Simba on Wed 21st Dec 2005 03:37 in reply to "RE[11]: One size fits all?"
Simba Member since:
2005-10-08

"You quite obviously have a very poor understanding of economic theory. Dumping may have been widely alleged, but it has rarely been proven."

My understanding of economic theory is quite good, thank you. But you understanding of how global business operates when they want to push products into the United States is very poor.

"And you're simply wrong about anti-trust laws. Selling below cost is a common business practice in tight commodity markets."

You cannot sell below cost when your specific purpose for doing so is to destroy your competition. Product dumping is illegal.

Reply Parent Score: 1