Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 29th Dec 2005 15:34 UTC, submitted by oGALAXYo
KDE "This document was created to show non-KDE people what they're missing - and if you haven't used KDE a lot, you're missing a lot of things and you may interested in reading this page to learn how many wonderful things you've been missing. I promise, this is a subjective analysis of why KDE rules. I was a GNOME user for a long time, one of those users who loved GNOME UI, and I didn't know how much things I was missing with KDE until I tried it."
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RE: Geeks
by dark child on Fri 30th Dec 2005 00:24 UTC in reply to "Geeks"
dark child
Member since:
2005-12-09

I don't agree that KDE mainly appeals to geeks. I have lots of friends and relatives who are non geeks and don't struggle to use KDE on my computers because its quite similar to Windows in some aspects. GNOME on the other hand is a bit confusing to a lot of them due to the unfamiliar look and feel. One of my aunts even requested that I install Mandriva with KDE in a dual boot scenario because she had been impressed with KDE and some of the office applications available on Linux.

As for Linux not having a large desktop market share, you have to remember that Linux on the desktop is still in its infancy. Previously many people who use Linux and Unix concentrated on the server side, but with the vast improvements in KDE, GNOME, Openoffice, firefox and popularity of distros like Ubuntu, Suse et al more people are beginning to see Linux as a viable alternative.

I think the learning curve puts some people off, but for those that have hands on support, its not much of an issue. It would also help if more computers were sold with Linux preinstalled and people didn't have to pay the MS tax. Many people will use whatever is installed on the PC they buy so Linux will never be as popular as windows if its not given the same exposure as Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Geeks
by unoengborg on Fri 30th Dec 2005 02:48 in reply to "RE: Geeks"
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't agree that KDE mainly appeals to geeks. I have lots of friends and relatives who are non geeks and don't struggle to use KDE on my computers because its quite similar to Windows in some aspects. GNOME on the other hand is a bit confusing to a lot of them due to the unfamiliar look and feel.


Yes, you are right in that KDE is very similar to windows, in fact I would describe KDE as windows on steroids. This is good and bad. The bad thing is that there are far too many people that have problems handling windows out there, and they are not likely to be any more lucky with KDE. Actually, you give a good example of this yourself, as you tell me that your aunt asked you to install KDE. If it had been easy enough she would have done it herself.

I take it that your aunt is a non geek user, but still the install process is too complicated. I don't know about your ant, but many users hadn't been more successful installing their favorite app on windows. This only tells us that being simple enough is not the same as being as simple as windows.

The good thing is that windows power users will have no problem handling it, and I expect that this group of users will be very happy using KDE. The problem is that today almost all people need to use a computer, even the guys on the factory floor that skipped a lot of classes in school and barely can read. Then we have the people that really doesn't care much about computers. They see the computer as an office item much like the telephone. As we get more and more of these kinds of users user interfaces need to adapt, that goes for windows as well as KDE.

To persuade people to switch from windows you need to offer something that is significantly different or it will be hard to motivate the cost of switching in most organizations. After all windows comes preinstalled on most new computers why spend extra money on installing a system that is very similar that quite possibly will be more expensive to support (more possibilities in the GUI -> more user questions, more possibilities in the GUI -> users will spend more time configuring than working)

To be successful, we need to offer something new and easier to use system. This is the niche that Apple with MacOS-X currently are trying to make theirs. It would be nice if there was some free alternative though, and KDE is not it. Gnome is closer, but have a long way to go, as it still looks like an attempt to make a GUI for Unix not an interface to get work done. So, lets hope for KDE4.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Geeks
by on Fri 30th Dec 2005 03:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Geeks"
Member since:

"So, lets hope for KDE4."

yes, we can only hope.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Geeks
by dark child on Fri 30th Dec 2005 08:42 in reply to "RE[2]: Geeks"
dark child Member since:
2005-12-09

Actually, you give a good example of this yourself, as you tell me that your aunt asked you to install KDE. If it had been easy enough she would have done it herself.
The problem for her would be installing Linux as a whole and not KDE. I agree that the Linux installation process would be complicated for many non geeks, but the same applies for Windows. Many people out there cannot install Windows on their own, so its not just a Linux problem.

Reply Parent Score: 1