Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 11th Jan 2006 18:06 UTC
Red Hat Red Hat is letting Novell's Mono software only into its noncommercial Fedora product line, the Linux seller said Tuesday. Red Hat has no plans at this time to include the Novell software in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, company spokeswoman Gillian Farquhar said, meaning that there are no plans right now to make it a standard part of the commercially supported product from the Linux leader.
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RE[10]: Mono is useful on Linux
by viton on Thu 12th Jan 2006 10:39 UTC in reply to "RE[9]: Mono is useful on Linux"
viton
Member since:
2005-08-09

"large scale programs has very little to do with static versus dynamically typed languages"
Dynamic typing can result in a lot of unpredictable bugs what can be avoided in static type system and of course it has a much lower performance.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Mystilleef Member since:
2005-06-29

Can you give examples?

Reply Parent Score: 1

rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

Dynamic typing can result in a lot of unpredictable bugs what can be avoided in static type system and of course it has a much lower performance.

The fact that dynamic typing causes more bugs is a myth, there is no research which backs this up. As for speed, there is no reason why a dynamic language can't use the same JIT techniques as Java does giving it the same speed. As a matter of fact, it was a dynamic language (Smalltalk) which first used a JIT. Hotspot was originally a Smalltalk JIT which Sun bought in order to make Java run at some type of reasonable speed.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Get a Life Member since:
2006-01-01

Dynamic languages rely on a superset of the techniques a JVM JITC would need to obtain similar levels of execution performance. This is because of the differences in message resolution as well as the differences in the presence of type information. Most research in JITC was done for dynamically-typed languages, namely Self as it pertains to Java, to make it "run at some type of reasonable speed." Animorphic applied the research its members had done in Self in the development of a SmallTalk-dialect environment called StrongTalk, which Sun later acquired and adapted as HotSpot.

Reply Parent Score: 1