Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 23rd Jan 2006 19:16 UTC
Microsoft Following news that Google refused to comply with a subpoena requiring the company to turn over search records from its database, much speculation swirled about the response from rivals MSN and Yahoo. MSN has broken its silence and now acknowledges that it did share search data, but no personal information. The subpoena was handed down by the US Department of Justice last summer, and was reportedly issued to gather data to support a child protection law that was struck down two years ago by the Supreme Court. Under that law, the government could punish pornography sites that made content easily accessible to minors.
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RE: Good on you Google!
by tomcat on Tue 24th Jan 2006 02:03 UTC in reply to "Good on you Google!"
tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

MS can't win. If it gives up the records, it's "evil". If it doesn't give up the records, it's "hiding something".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Good on you Google!
by morgoth on Tue 24th Jan 2006 02:37 in reply to "RE: Good on you Google!"
morgoth Member since:
2005-07-08

The internet was built on anonymity. I know George Bush Jr. and gang would love nothing more than to bug EVERY single household in the world for their spies and the CIA, but I, quite frankly, couldn't give a rats ass about them. The US DOJ or any other government has no rights to this information - period. Microsoft rolled over and gave it to them, which really does show how much contempt they hold their customers with, and how little they value the values on which the Internet was built.

Dave

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Good on you Google!
by n4cer on Tue 24th Jan 2006 05:47 in reply to "RE[2]: Good on you Google!"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

The internet was built on anonymity. I know George Bush Jr. and gang would love nothing more than to bug EVERY single household in the world for their spies and the CIA, but I, quite frankly, couldn't give a rats ass about them. The US DOJ or any other government has no rights to this information - period. Microsoft rolled over and gave it to them, which really does show how much contempt they hold their customers with, and how little they value the values on which the Internet was built.

How does aggregate data intrude on anonimity?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Good on you Google!
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 24th Jan 2006 11:15 in reply to "RE: Good on you Google!"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

MS can't win. If it gives up the records, it's "evil". If it doesn't give up the records, it's "hiding something".

Yup. Sad, really.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Good on you Google!
by SlackerJack on Tue 24th Jan 2006 11:41 in reply to "RE: Good on you Google!"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

Well Microsoft seem to be winning at everything and anyone suggesting that Microsoft put backdoors via WMF MUST be smoking crack right?

Since when have they lost something that REALLY did them damage?, because they can get away with murder and just get slapped with a fine.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Good on you Google!
by glarepate on Tue 24th Jan 2006 18:41 in reply to "RE: Good on you Google!"
glarepate Member since:
2006-01-04

MS can't win...

Do you suppose if they could go back and do it over again they wouldn't have gotten themselves into this predicament? Maybe made a more secure set of products or decided to compete fairly in the marketplace or not steal so much IP?

If they had done things fairly and legally the first time around they surely wouldn't have wound up in a situation where there are so many fanbois defending them because they would have established a reputation as a decent and honest company.

Or is their situation the fault of those who, admittedly illegally in many cases, exposed the weakness in design of their OS with 150,000 pieces of malware, viruses, trojans and worms [oh my]? Or the fault of those who beat them in court for their theft, decption and predatory monopolistic practices?

Pray tell, what could have saved them from this dilemma?

Reply Parent Score: 1