Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 23rd Jan 2006 19:20 UTC
Legal "DRM is a lie. When an agenda driven DRM infection peddler gets on a soapbox and blathers about how it is necessary to protect the BMW payments of a producer who leeches off the talented, rest assured, they are lying to you. DRM has absolutely nothing to do with protecting content, it is about protecting the wallets of major corporations. The funny thing is they aren't protecting it from you, they are protecting it from each other."
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JeffS
Member since:
2005-07-12

"She just casually mentioned that her sister bought the CD and 'made a copy' for her."

" this same person attempted to let her stepdad 'borrow' her Windows XP install CD"

What you're talking about here is what I consider, and many, many, many people consider, to be "fair use".

If I buy something, I should be able to share that something with a friend or family member. Just imagine if you bought a book, read it, then loaned it to your brother or someone else. You have a moral right to do so. Also, I should be able to loan my skill saw to my neighbor. There are many such examples.

The copyright on Windows and some CDs forbids such "fair use", and it is, quite frankly, immoral to forbid such fair use.

Now what is fair for content producers to forbid is unauthorized redistribution for profit. That's what does actual damage to someone's business-depending, revenue-producing intellectual property.

Piracy, or casual sharing among family and friends, does not do damage to a content producer's business or livlihood. Nor does file sharing on the internet, as most studies/surveys have shown that the biggest file dowloaders/sharers also tend to be the biggest purchasers, and they even increase their purchasing of content after downloading heavily.

DRM being used by large companies is only their stategy to gain a leg up on their competion and extract more cash from consumers. DRM provides no benefits and only causes hassles and/or limitations on consumers. DRM is a disaster.

Reply Parent Score: 1

bogomipz Member since:
2005-07-11

There's a fundamental difference between digital content and "real world stuff". Digital content can be copied with next to zero cost, a book or skill saw can't.

Now, let's for a minute imagine that it was possible to copy a skill saw. Would you consider giving a copy to your neighbor to be "fair use"?

I'm not supporting DRM. I just wanted to point out that digital content is a very special form of merchandise. "Information Rules" by Chapiro and Varian is an interesting read; http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/087584863X

Reply Parent Score: 2

MadDwarf Member since:
2005-07-07

There is a fundamental difference between lending a single copy (say a book) that can only be read by one at a time, and making a copy of something. Would it still be fair use to photocopy a book you like to give to your friend?
To let someone copy something is not lending it them. and to copy a whole CD from a friend is hardly fair use is it? one track, previews of tracks ... but an album (even a single) is a Full Work - wholesale copying is against the law (most places)

Reply Parent Score: 1

sean batten Member since:
2005-07-06

If I buy something, I should be able to share that something with a friend or family member

Sure, but normally when you share something with a friend if affects your ability to use it. For example, if I lend a friend my car I can use it while they've got it. When you make a copy of a cd you're producing another instance of the original and giving it away.

If you want to lend a friend a cd then give them the original and wait for them to give it back to you!

Reply Parent Score: 2

Deletomn Member since:
2005-07-06

JeffS: If I buy something, I should be able to share that something with a friend or family member. Just imagine if you bought a book, read it, then loaned it to your brother or someone else. You have a moral right to do so. Also, I should be able to loan my skill saw to my neighbor. There are many such examples.

Being a big lender of stuff myself, I can say that this like most "pro-piracy" stuff is a half-truth. sean batten mentioned how when you normally lend something it affects your ability to use it. Let me put it you this way... With my books on programming (which I frequently lend out) I can only lend any particular one to ONE friend at a time. That's right ONE. And while it's lent out I have NO access to it. However, if I lend my free software out, I can lend it to countless people at one time and I never lose access to it. Big difference.

Secondly... As I mentioned in a previous post, a lot of this has to do with intent. A lot of people when they pirate, intend to keep whatever it is, not to just try it out or use it for one day for a very specific one time purpose or what have you. Its generally there to stay. Meaning the word "lend" in the instance of piracy (like the term "try out") tends to mean "give" and "keep forever".

Reply Parent Score: 2

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

If I buy something, I should be able to share that something with a friend or family member. Just imagine if you bought a book, read it, then loaned it to your brother or someone else. You have a moral right to do so. Also, I should be able to loan my skill saw to my neighbor. There are many such examples.[i]

The difference between Windows, a book, and a skill saw, is that when you 'loan' Windows to somebody, you're not really loaning it to them .. you're [i]giving
it to them. Unlike a book or a skill saw, you can do that without losing the original. To make your analogy fit, you would have to make a Star Trek-style copy of the physical devices and loan out the copy while keeping the original to yourself.

Also, in regards to piracy, so you make a copy of a software program you bought and 'loan' it to your friend. Ok, fine. But what is the difference between that and somebody who uplaods a torrent on the Internet and 10,000 people download it? In other words, how many copies can you 'loan' out before it comes wrong? 1? 5? 1 million? Where do you draw the line?

Reply Parent Score: 1