Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 14th Feb 2006 10:50 UTC, submitted by editingwhiz
Google Google and CodeWeavers are working together to bring Google's popular Windows Picasa photo editing and sharing program to Linux. The program is now in a limited beta test. If this program is successful, other Google applications will be following it to the Linux desktop, sources say. The Linux Picasa implementation includes the full feature set of the Windows Picasa 2.x software. It is not, strictly speaking, a port of Picasa to Linux. Instead, Linux Picasa combines Windows Picasa code and Wine technology to run Windows Picasa on Linux. This, however, will be transparent to Linux users, when they download, install, and run the free program on their systems.
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This is far beyond "wine bla.exe"
by Ford Prefect on Tue 14th Feb 2006 13:07 UTC
Ford Prefect
Member since:
2006-01-16

You should notice that there is something called winelib which gives you the opportunity to write/compile native code. It's just like if Wine would be a toolkit (alike QT or WxWidgets) and the program is abstracted of underlying layers and only use toolkit functions. This goes beyond drawn Widgets deep into primitives.

Yet, it is still a native program, perhaps with statically linked winelib, but could also be linked dynamically, like any other used toolkit libs.


This should result in a much more clean, stable and efficient run than issueing wine with an executable file!


Still it is not very userfriendly because the application will still behaviour "strangely" (read: different) in the world of Gnome, KDE, or others.

Reply Score: 2

weirdnut Member since:
2006-01-19

>> Still it is not very userfriendly because the
>> application will still behaviour "strangely"
>> (read: different) in the world of Gnome, KDE, or
>> others.

Just like it behaves differently than 'normal' Windows programs. But that doesn't matter, because Picasa is more userfriendly than your average Linux (GNOME, KDE, etc) and Windows program (ie. even a dumb user can use it without much hassle).

There's userfriendly, and there's userfriendly. Many people think they know the difference.

And please stop this whining, kids. You are all complaining about things you're getting for free. What's wrong with you people? Spoiled?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

You got me wrong, I was talking about the general usage of wine for native linux builds. I never ran this particular program.

In general, it is not a userfriendly idea to have a GUI completely apart the "common" GUI in the particular environment the user works with and should be used to.

It's just a shame to see everybody here talking about "x86 only", "I want it native" etc. without really knowing how this is done. A little read on wine's Website would help a lot ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Ookaze Member since:
2005-11-14

Just like it behaves differently than 'normal' Windows programs. But that doesn't matter, because Picasa is more userfriendly than your average Linux (GNOME, KDE, etc) and Windows program (ie. even a dumb user can use it without much hassle)

You mean, Digikam is a superior above average Linux program ?
Many programs are actually as cool as Digikam on Linux.

There's userfriendly, and there's userfriendly. Many people think they know the difference

And some just look at their computer illiterate family, and are amazed at how Linux is user-friendly.

And please stop this whining, kids. You are all complaining about things you're getting for free. What's wrong with you people? Spoiled?

You must be new in computing.
People like me have already been beaten by old proprietary apps that won't work anymore some years after launch, which are no more supported, or that require all kind of old compatibility binaries to run.
This creates a mess nobody wants to live with.

Reply Parent Score: 2