Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Feb 2006 17:59 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "Mark Shuttleworth is the founder of Thawte, the first certification authority to sell public SSL certificates. After selling Thawte to Verisign, Mark moved on to training as an astronaut in Russia and visiting space. Once he got back he founded Ubuntu, the leading GNU/Linux distribution. He agreed on releasing a quick interview to Free Software Magazine." One of the more interesting quotes: "With Ubuntu, it's still too early to say we've been successful. My personal goal is to make the distro sustainable - then there will be a team that pays its own way and can focus on producing the best free software desktop on the planet without my interference!"
Thread beginning with comment 97730
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
siride
Member since:
2006-01-02

What difference does it make if some distros use different package management systems? If you can always get most of the software through your distribution's package management system (which is generally really easy, point and click in Synaptic, for example), then who cares? Third-parties can either take the extra time to build RPMs alongside DEBs or use something like autopackage or klik to package their software. Some, like Java and other big third-party software titles have their own installers that work like in Windows. And finally, third parties don't have to target every little distribution. If they hit Red Hat, SuSE, Ubuntu/Debian and Mandriva, they've covered most everybody. People using more obscure or difficult to use distros like Gentoo are already savvy enough to do the tricks necessary to install software meant for another distribution.

People like to bitch and moan about different package formats, but in reality, it's not a problem.

Reply Parent Score: 2

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

People like to bitch and moan about different package formats, but in reality, it's not a problem.

Yes, but it's a refreshing change from the constant bitching and moaning about mp3 support dooming linux to failure.

Reply Parent Score: 1

netpython Member since:
2005-07-06

[1]Yes, but it's a refreshing change from the constant bitching and moaning about mp3 support dooming linux to failure.[/i]

Linux is an eco-system of distributions.As such it will most likely not disapear.

If you think they ¨moan and sigh¨ about wether mp3 is included or not you missed a crucial part of the equation.Linux and OSS in particular is about the indiscriminate freedom of choice.In this case the freedom to include propietary content or not.It's still not possible to get mp3 support included legally,even if you are prepared to pay.

My guess:Time limit patents to max 10 years or so.
This way OS's vendors can compete more on OS specific merits than included propietary stuff alone.

Reply Parent Score: 1

abhaysahai Member since:
2005-10-20

I was referring to different package format from the point of view of a new user, but its amazing that an experienced user like you finds gentoo "Obscure" ( it is in top 10 on distrowatch) and difficult to use when you yourself write
"I can also easily try out very experimental software, even through portage (which is a real plus). It doesn't always work, but I find it's easier to deal with the resulting breakage on Gentoo than on other systems. "

http://osnews.com/permalink.php?news_id=13361&comment_id=87591

Please decide if you find gentoo easy to use before posting.

Reply Parent Score: -1