Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 28th Mar 2018 01:46 UTC, submitted by Alfman
Legal

A US federal court has overturned the jury's decision in favour of Google from 2016.

Google's use of Java shortcuts to develop Android went too far and was a violation of Oracle's copyrights, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit ruled Tuesday. The case - first filed in 2010 - was remanded to a federal court in California to determine how much the Alphabet Inc. unit should pay. Oracle had been seeking $8.8 billion, though that number could grow. Google expressed disappointment and said it's considering its next steps in the case.

The dispute, which could have far-reaching implications for the entire software industry, has divided Silicon Valley for years between those who develop the code that makes software steps function and those who develop software programs and say their "fair use" of the code is an exception to copyright law.

"It's a momentous decision on the issue of fair use," lawyer Mark Schonfeld of Burns & Levinson in Boston, who's been following the case and isn't involved. "It is very, very important for the software industry. I think it's going to go to the Supreme Court because the Federal Circuit has made a very controversial decision."

This could be one of the absolute worst legal decisions in technology history.

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protomank
Member since:
2006-08-03

The wheel would be patented and the axis that holds it, would be also be patenteable.
To use fire for a barbecue you would have to pay a fee for Zeus, as Prometheus just stole that information from him.

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