Solaris Archive

OpenSolaris Soon to Run on IBM Mainframes

IBM and Sun Microsystems are in the final stages of an 18-month-long project to adapt the OpenSolaris operating system to run optimally on Big Blue's z System mainframes. David Boyes, president and chief technology officer of Sine Nomine Associates, a consultancy that handled most of the integration and migration duties, told eWEEK at the Gartner Data Center Conference 2007 that the new IBM-tuned version of OpenSolaris will be ready soon. He declined to be more specific.

Sun Advances File Sharing with Windows

"File-sharing between Windows and Sun's OpenSolaris Unix platform is being bolstered through two projects at Sun. The OpenSolaris project: CIFS Server features server software source code that implements the CIFS protocol also known as Server Message Block, the standard for Windows file-sharing services, Sun said. The internal CIFS server enables Microsoft users to store and retrieve files on an OpenSolaris system, Sun said. This project and a related effort, CIFS client, improve the usefulness of OpenSolaris in data environments that serve NFS and CIFS clients, Sun said. Sun recently donated server source code that implements CIFS to the OpenSolaris Project."

Review: OpenSolaris Project Indiana

"With much anticipation by the OpenSolaris community, last night Sun had released their first developer preview for the binary desktop distribution that we have known over the past couple of months as Project Indiana. Ian Murdock and company are optimistic for this project that will address some of the existing Solaris adoption barriers when it comes to the installation, package management, and familiarization along with revitalizing the user experience. How does this first milestone of Project Indiana, which in fact will be named OpenSolaris, rank when it comes to meeting their objectives? In this review, we have a lot of information and screenshots on this long-awaited OpenSolaris binary distribution."

Project Indiana Developer Preview Released

The first milestone of Project Indiana (part of the OpenSolaris.org community) is now available - called "OpenSolaris Developer Preview." The OpenSolaris Developer Preview is the first milestone of Project Indiana. It is a single CD combined live/install image: a core operating system, kernel, system libraries, a desktop environment and a package management system. It is not a final release and is intended for developers to try, test, and provide feedback. Get your copy now.

Project Indiana Release Brings New Package Manager

Project Indiana, Sun Microsystems' Linux-like OpenSolaris effort, will begin shipping to developers before the end of October, the company announced Oct. 15 at its open-source summit press event here. The developer release will include Image Packaging System, a new package manager slated for inclusion in the next version of Solaris, but won't be back-ported to Solaris 10, the most recent version to ship, said Ian Murdock, Sun's chief operating systems platform strategist, in an address to the media. All of the technology developed under Project Indiana will be delivered through OpenSolaris going forward, he said. The full release is expected in March. More here.

Solaris Express Developer Edition 9/07 Released

Solaris Express Developer Edition is a free, quarterly release of Sun's next generation Solaris Operating System built from the source code repository at OpenSolaris.org. The release includes the latest tools, technologies, and platforms to create applications for the Solaris OS, Java Application Platforms, and Web 2.0. "Major highlights: new Solaris installer - the first major rewrite of the Solaris installer since Solaris 8 makes installation much easier; D-Light, the GUI tool to bring the power of DTrace to a broad developer audience; service offerings have been augmented with the addition of installation and configuration support." Update: Review here.

New Project Indiana Details Emerge

Ian Murdock took the stage in one of the small rooms at the Moscone Center West to talk about the OpenSolaris Binary Distribution that is currently known as Project Indiana. We captured all of the slides Ian had shown, and while most of the information he shared was just reiterated from his past talks, there was some interesting details worth sharing. Among the advantages of Project Indiana is that it will use Sun's ZFS as the default file-system, and Project Indiana will be taking full advantage of its abilities to create snapshots and perform rollbacks if something with the system's software goes wrong. With Sun's past work with the GNOME project, GNOME will be the desktop environment in Project Indiana said Ian Murdock.

Sun: ‘OpenSolaris Will Challenge Linux’

Sun seeks to apply the lessons of Linux and turn open source Solaris into an operating system to rival Linux and to be as commonly used as Java. Sun Microsystems has ambitious plans for the commercial and open-source versions of its Solaris operating system, hoping to achieve for Solaris the kind of ubiquity already enjoyed by Java. In addition, Sun released Update 4 for Solaris 10 (also called Solaris 08/07), introducing a major enhancement in its OS virtualization technology called Solaris Containers.

Sun Runs Virtual Linux Inside Solaris Containers

When Solaris Containers for Linux Applications is released into the source code with Update 4 on Aug. 27, Sun customers will be able to run unmodified Linux binaries made for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS. Formerly called BrandZ, Solaris Containers for Linux Applications is an upgrade to the Containers operating system virtualization technology already included in Solaris 10. The update will be released at no charge to existing Solaris customers.

Project Indiana: Turning OpenSolaris Into a Practical Platform

"OpenSolaris is possibly Sun's most significant attempt to garner relevance in a market that increasingly demands the freedom and flexibility of open-source software. Although the availability of source code under an open license imbues the platform with considerable value, broader adoption is predicated on Sun's capacity to build a strong community. Project Indiana represents Sun's latest strategy for building mindshare and expanding the reach of OpenSolaris."

BeleniX 0.6.1 Released

BeleniX 0.6.1 has been released. This is primarily a bugfix release fixing some of the bigger bugs in 0.6 though there remains some more to fix in 0.6.2. "BeleniX is a *NIX distribution that is built using the OpenSolaris source base. It is currently a LiveCD distribution but is intended to grow into a complete distro that can be installed to hard disk."

The Solaris Installation Experience

"There's a problem with Solaris and Sun knows it. The installation experience of Solaris (along with other areas) could be greatly improved. The installer doesn't 'suck' as it's easy and known to Solaris administrators, but for a Linux or Windows user it could prove to be a bit challenging. For those of you that have never tried out Solaris, what we've decided to do is to show you this 'usability gap' with the installation process in Solaris compared to Linux. Is the experience really that bad?"

Sun Solaris Check Tool

"It wasn't until last week during a meeting with Sun that some new light was shed on the Solaris Check Tool and as a result we decided to explore this tool further. Check Tool is a bootable CD that lets the user know whether the hardware they have installed is likely to work with Solaris or not. If a third-party driver is needed for a particular piece of hardware, the Check Tool will even provide a link to the driver needed. There are currently a few rough spots with the tool, but improvements are planned and in this article we will share more information on this program that can tell you in a matter of minutes whether you'll face a hardware compatibility nightmare or will be running Solaris/Solaris Express with ease."

Nexenta Alpha 7 Released

Nexenta alpha 7 has been released. "OpenSolaris & NWS build 61 (non-debug); installer: new partitioning wizard, installer log (via F3), usability fixes, built-in driver availability detection; improved SVR4 compatibility (pkgadd, pkgrm, etc.); improved live upgrade - it is believed to work for all previously released alphas."

Sun Hopes for Linux-Like Solaris

In an effort to spur adoption of Solaris, Sun has begun a project code-named Indiana to try to give its operating system some of the trappings of Linux. The project is one of the items on the to-do list of Ian Murdock, founder of the Debian version of Linux and, as of March, Sun's chief operating systems officer. Though he wouldn't confirm the name of the project, Murdock - who's from Indiana - discussed the project's essence at the JavaOne conference here Monday, and Sun spokesman Russ Castronovo confirmed the name.