Gnome Archive

Free Gnome-based Linux Distro Targets Smartphones

A free Gnome-based Linux distribution for mobile devices such as smartphones and PDAs has achieved a major release. OpenedHand's Poky Linux 3.0 ("Blinky") is based on X11, GTK+, and the Matchbox window manager, much like the Nokia-sponsored Maemo.org project. However, in place of the proprietary Hildon GUI layer, it includes a new "Sato 0.1" plain GTK+ component.

GNOME 2.19.6 Released

GNOME 2.19.6 has been released yesterday. "This is our sixth development release on our road towards GNOME 2.20.0, which will be released in September 2007. New features are still arriving, so your mission is simple : Go download it. Go compile it. Go test it. And go hack on it, document it, translate it, fix it."

GNOME Online Desktop: ‘We Will Have to Include Windows’

"During this years GUADEC Red Hat developer Havoc Pennington proposed his idea of an 'Online Desktop' to the developers of the GNOME project. Through deep integration with web services and 'zero-maintenance' the Open Source client aims to get the 'perfect window to the Internet'. During GUADEC Andreas Proschofsky had the chance to talk to Pennington about advantages and possible problems of the Online Desktop concept, the necessity of Windows-support and about Red Hats 'return to the desktop'."

Open Source Developers Calling for the Next Desktop Revolution

During his opening speech at the GNOME Developers conference GUADEC Jono Bacon, community manager for the Ubuntu distribution, called for a common vision inside the project, an area in which the project as a whole is currently lacking. Only a few hours later Red Hat developers Havoc Pennington and Bryan Clark presented their own proposal for a reinvention of the Open Source desktop: The GNOME Online Desktop. My take: As I have been saying for a long time, GNOME needs a vision (and leaders) for the future. I'm glad that people are finally stepping up.

The GNOME Journal, June Edition

The latest issue of the GNOME Journal has just been published. It features an article about GStreamer audio effects, an interview with Ken VanDine about GNOME 2.18 Live Media releases, an introduction to Accerciser, and a summary of GNOME.conf.au 2007. Writers in this edition are Stefan Kost, Paul Cutler, Eitan Isaacson, and Davyd Madeley, respectively.

Should GNOME Get a Global Application Menubar?

In the GNOME bugzilla, there is an ongoing discussion about whether or not to include a patch into the default GNOME installation which would enable GNOME to (optionally) have a global application menubar, similar to that of the Mac OS and KDE (in the latter it is optional and off by default). Installation instructions and .deb packages, as well as a 60-page (and counting) discussion of the patch, are available on the UbuntuForums. Read on for a poll on this issue.

GNOME Mobile and Embedded Initiative Launched

The GNOME Foundation announced today the GNOME Mobile and Embedded Initiative (GMAE) today at the Embedded Linux Conference in Santa Clara, Calif. The initiative is aimed at bolstering GNOME usage as an embedded and mobile development platform. The initiative has been in development since last year, says GNOME Foundation board member Jeff Waugh. The platform will be distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL). In the next 12 months the group plans to add a mobile email framework called Tinymail, the GeoClue geolocation service, Java Mobile & Embedded (Java ME), PulseAudio audio management, and the HAL hardware information system.

The GNOME Journal, March Edition

The latest issue of the GNOME Journal has just been published. It features an introduction to GTK+ cross-platform application development, an interview with Jakub Steiner and Andreas Nilsson about the Tango Project, the first article of a series about free desktop companies, and a letter from the editor. Writers in this edition are John D. Ramsdell, Alexandre Prokoudine, Sri Ramkrishna, and Jim Hodapp.

GNOME 2.18.0 RC1 Released

GNOME 2.18.0 RC1 (2.17.92) has been released. "This is the last unstable release before 2.18.0. We've all added cool features, important bug fixes, great translations, or shiny documentation during the past six months. And it'll be soon ready for public consumption. There's still one week before the hard code freeze, so it's not too late to fix this last bug you're ashamed of."