Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 16th Apr 2006 13:55 UTC, submitted by aaronb
Hardware, Embedded Systems SilentPCReview tries to answer an important question: what is the best power efficiency achievable with currently available AMD and Intel processors that can be used on a desktop PC? The answer: "Our focus on thermals, power and energy efficiency led to mostly predictable results: mobile processors are best, followed by AMD desktop processor in general, and then Intel desktop processors. The power efficiency of AMD Athlon 64 single and dual core processors is excellent, even for their highest performance models. The Intel desktop processors suffer from inefficiency, even on the 65nm die. The Core Duo is a delightful exception in Intel's camp, with probably the highest performance-per-watt ratio of all the processors in our survey."
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annoying study, memory controllers anyone?
by bnolsen on Mon 17th Apr 2006 04:50 UTC
bnolsen
Member since:
2006-01-06

This study was annoying, almost a marketing gift for Intel.

So they ended up measuring the power of the AMD products which include an integrated memory controller and comparing the numbers directly to Intel parts which don't have an integrated memory controller. And then they even fail to mention this fundamental difference.

The only real numbers that have any bearing was the total system power dissapated, not the CPU power.

Reply Score: 3

cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

"This study was annoying, almost a marketing gift for Intel."

Load:
Intel PD 930 Presler (3.0 GHz), 1.22V: 93.6W DC for CPU, 146W AC for system.

AMD A64 X2 3800+ Toledo (2.0 GHz), 1.39V: 58.0W DC for CPU, 109W AC for system.

Idle:
AMD A64 X2 3800+ Toledo (1.0GHz), 1.18V: 5.6W DC for CPU, 51W AC for system.

Intel PD 930 Presler (2.4~3.0 GHz), 1.22V: 32W DC for CPU, 75W AC for system.

Intel looks fantastic, there, doesn't it?

"The only real numbers that have any bearing was the total system power dissapated, not the CPU power." (emphassis added)

...bearing on what?

I know I'm more interested in the DC power numbers than the AC ones: they show the heat dissipated by the CPU's heatsink, and show how far they could undervolt the CPU, and how much that affected the heat it created. That means more or less room to undervolt fans, and maybe even remove fans from the system (I've got 4, after all!).

"So they ended up measuring the power of the AMD products which include an integrated memory controller and comparing the numbers directly to Intel parts which don't have an integrated memory controller. And then they even fail to mention this fundamental difference."

It's not a fundamental difference, in reference to silencing the computer. The CPU heatsink has to cool X watts. Whether that X watts includes a memory controller or not does not matter. The chipset can be passively cooled.

Reply Parent Score: 1