Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 13th Jun 2006 22:16 UTC
GNU, GPL, Open Source It's time for the Windows and Linux communities to drop the religious war and get together in a hurry to put the strengths of each operating system to best use, according to a nationally recognized authority on Windows Server. At the same time, Microsoft has been reaching out to the open-source community to try to find ways to overcome the incompatibilities between software distributed under the GNU General Public License and its own commercial software.
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RE: Strange comment.
by hal2k1 on Wed 14th Jun 2006 05:58 UTC in reply to "Strange comment."
hal2k1
Member since:
2005-11-11

//If Microsoft really wants to "overcome the incompatibilities between software distributed under the GNU General Public License and its own commercial software", they would release information to the public regarding those things which would aid both sides in interoperating. //

I think Microsoft are not talking at all about interoperability here.

What Microsoft wants to do is use the code of open source projects in its own offerings, but be allowed to charge end users even though Microsoft didn't write the code. Microsoft already did this trick with the BSD TCP/IP stack.

IMO Microsoft wants to be able to use the open source code without having to provide the source back to anyone.

Here is someone else who has interpreted this in the same way:

http://trends.newsforge.com/article.pl?sid=06/06/13/195257&from=rss

From that article:

Bob Muglia, who was quoted in the article as saying, "The GPL has an inherent incompatibility that is, to my knowledge, impossible to overcome."

" Having planted his falsehood, Muglia is then seen retreating back into his allegedly reasonable stand. You know the one. It seems he is open to open source licenses like the ones the BSDs or MIT use. And why not? Microsoft learned TCP from BSD and stole Kerberos from MIT. What really frustrates Microsoft about the GPL is not so much its terms, which protect the rights of developers and users, but rather that the GPL defends code from intellectual piracy."

Edited 2006-06-14 06:04

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