Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 22nd Nov 2006 18:16 UTC, submitted by anonymous
Novell and Ximian Novell and Microsoft recently entered into an agreement regarding software patents (really?) that betrays the rest of the Free Software community, including the very people who wrote Novell's own system, for Novell's sole financial beneift, according to Bruce Perens. Join Perens in signing an open letter to Novell's CEO Ron Hovsepian. "As the agreement stands today, it betrays the authors of the software you re-market and their users worldwide for Novell's sole commercial benefit."
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Why is Bruce Perens upset?
by TaterSalad on Wed 22nd Nov 2006 19:27 UTC
TaterSalad
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm slightly confused by why a lot of people are upset over this deal. It offers protection by not getting sued saving companies time and money. Part of the GPL license states what you can and can't do with patents.

7. If, as a consequence of a court judgment or allegation of patent infringement or for any other reason (not limited to patent issues), conditions are imposed on you (whether by court order, agreement or otherwise) that contradict the conditions of this License, they do not excuse you from the conditions of this License. If you cannot distribute so as to satisfy simultaneously your obligations under this License and any other pertinent obligations, then as a consequence you may not distribute the Program at all. For example, if a patent license would not permit royalty-free redistribution of the Program by all those who receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then the only way you could satisfy both it and this License would be to refrain entirely from distribution of the Program.

You chose the GPL, you read the license, you know what you are getting yourself into with patents. If your application violates the patent then you charge a royalty, if it doesn't then distribute away for free. If someone could explain to me why Novell shouldn't go for protection on the issue that would great. I'm just not understanding what the real problem is.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Why is Bruce Perens upset?
by DrillSgt on Wed 22nd Nov 2006 19:33 in reply to "Why is Bruce Perens upset?"
DrillSgt Member since:
2005-12-02

"You chose the GPL, you read the license, you know what you are getting yourself into with patents. If your application violates the patent then you charge a royalty, if it doesn't then distribute away for free. If someone could explain to me why Novell shouldn't go for protection on the issue that would great. I'm just not understanding what the real problem is."

There are those in the "community" that believe anything to do with Microsoft is evil. If this agreement would have been made with any other entity they would not see a problem. Basically there is no real problem but the OSS pundits themselves.

Reply Parent Score: 0