Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 30th Nov 2006 22:51 UTC
Novell and Ximian Novell on Nov. 30 announced its latest NetWare upgrade operating system, the Linux-powered Novell Open Enterprise Server 2. OES, which will be based on Novell's SLES 10, is designed to be a drop-in replacement for Novell NetWare servers, and a direct competitor to Microsoft's Server 2003.
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What should I buy Novell?
by apolitical1 on Fri 1st Dec 2006 18:55 UTC
apolitical1
Member since:
2006-12-01

Yikes, that should read "Why should I buy Novell". Sorry, first post. ;)

I do not care about politics, but Novell has not appeared too smart lately. Perhaps they have not been given a fair shake by the press? Anyway, I am curious about their technologies but do not trust their marketing.

For my business, I want to standardize on Solaris or a GNU/Linux distro for both servers and workstations. Cost is not the tightest constraint. Why should I buy Novell? How are its offerings the best for business and software development? What are its killer technologies? Which have the brightest future?

Please, Novell advocates, I would love to join you, but what is the business case in terms of their stuff? TIA--your kindness is most appreciated!

Edited 2006-12-01 19:01

Reply Score: 1

RE: What should I buy Novell?
by IanSVT on Fri 1st Dec 2006 19:28 in reply to "What should I buy Novell?"
IanSVT Member since:
2005-07-06

For my business, I want to standardize on Solaris or a GNU/Linux distro for both servers and workstations. Cost is not the tightest constraint. Why should I buy Novell? How are its offerings the best for business and software development? What are its killer technologies? Which have the brightest future?

As anything else, it really depends on your specific situation. Let's take a business, 200 employees/workstations, 5 servers. Novell would be able to provide you with the desktop, or you could use another desktop if you so required it. I would lean toward SLED just because it has the Novell Client available on it, which allows for login script generation from a central point. So I could write in the scrip to map a server file system volume to /mnt/share1. You could also mount it using CIFS/SMB. Novell OES offers one of the best directory services out there. It's a multi master directory which can be designed with WAN links so if your servers are seperated, you can still use the directory and replication benefits.

OES has NSS, which is a journaled file system and tied into the directory for ease of administration from one(or many, in Novell's less than tightly knit console offerings) central location.

You have the option for workstation management through Zenworks, and asset control, and imaging, application deployment.....

GroupWise is one of the few enterprise level groupware environments out there. It has had problems from time to time, such as GroupWise 7.0 being released too early. However, it is a very capable groupware system with multiple client support, webaccess support, and you can spread it out over multiple servers to distribute load.

This sounds like a sales pitch, but it's not. The reality is, Novell's software, like every other bit of software out there(open source or otherwise) has it's ups and downs. However, many of Novell's software services are well thought out and time tested. They are the only software vendor that has a full framework of identity based administration for mixed linux and windows environments. I know alluded that you don't want windows, but the flexability is there in the odd event you need it.

If you're really interested, call Novell and ask them who your channel partner might be and call them. They might be able to get into a real nuts and bolts discussion on this for you.

Reply Parent Score: 3