Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Dec 2006 11:38 UTC
X11, Window Managers In 2002, both KDE and GNOME released their last major revisions; KDE released KDE 3.0 on 3rd April, while GNOME followed shortly after with GNOME 2.0 on 27th June. For the Linux desktop, therefore, 2002 was an important year. Since then, we have continiously been fed point releases which added bits of functionaility and speed improvements, but no major revision has yet seen the light of day. What's going on?
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RE[2]: want innovation?
by wargum on Fri 22nd Dec 2006 00:01 UTC in reply to "RE: want innovation?"
wargum
Member since:
2006-12-15

> Packaging software is up to the developers/distro makers.

That is true for free (as in beer) software. But I think Linux can only take off with more standards for the gazillion different distros. The current situation is, compared to other platforms, a nightmare for developers of commercial software.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: want innovation?
by archiesteel on Fri 22nd Dec 2006 06:51 in reply to "RE[2]: want innovation?"
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

That is true for free (as in beer) software. But I think Linux can only take off with more standards for the gazillion different distros. The current situation is, compared to other platforms, a nightmare for developers of commercial software.

Actually, that's not true at all. There are standalone installers for all distros, which are used by such programes as Google Earth, OpenOffice, Adobe Acrobat, Crossover Office, etc. Often these are statically linked so there's no dependency issues.

Packaging a set of debs and rpms isn't that hard, either. If software hobbyists can do it on their free time, I don't see why paid developers would have such a hard time.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: want innovation?
by twenex on Fri 22nd Dec 2006 10:26 in reply to "RE[3]: want innovation?"
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

Packaging a set of debs and rpms isn't that hard, either. If software hobbyists can do it on their free time, I don't see why paid developers would have such a hard time.

Because they've standardised on Microsoft Click 'n' Drool Basic!

Reply Parent Score: 2