Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 23rd Jan 2007 21:16 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "The most visible part of Windows Vista is the Aero interface, and while we can't deny that it looks very swish we find it very hard to get excited by a shiny new GUI. Instead, we're looking forward to new Vista hardware, which includes a new use for the humble USB memory key and much, much more. So what will the ultimate Windows Vista notebook offer?"
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r3m0t
Member since:
2005-07-25

ReadyBoost does not make a USB drive act as RAM, nor as swap. It caches something or other (not sure what), but even if you disconnect the USB drive without doing it from the ReadyBoost interface, the computer continues to work perfectly.

Apparently most USB flash drives have a fast area and a slow area. ReadyBoost only uses the fast area, so not every USB drive is compatible, and not all of the capacity will be usable.

Finally, an MS blogger claimed that they had considered the possibility of wearing out a flash drive, and toned down the aggressiveness of the caching to reduce the number of writes.


Still, I think the technology is pointless.

Reply Parent Score: 1

h3rman Member since:
2006-08-09

ReadyBoost does not make a USB drive act as RAM, nor as swap. It caches something or other (not sure what), but even if you disconnect the USB drive without doing it from the ReadyBoost interface, the computer continues to work perfectly.

Fine, but.. isn't all that merely semantics?
USB Flash isn't RAM, nor can it ever behave like that. It's flash. Call this thing external swap, call it anything you like, but something must be going on in that USB drive?

So I agree with you: to me too, it's an increasingly pointless idea. Just get some more RAM, most people have no idea what to ask for their birthdays anyway. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2