Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 2nd Apr 2007 15:23 UTC
Apple This morning, Apple and EMI announced the availabilty of DRM-free music in the iTunes Music Store. DRM-free songs will feature a higher audio quality (256kbps), and will cost USD/EUR 1.29 per song. They also announced that they are working on getting The Beatles' music in the iTMS.
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Cynical?
by Laurence on Mon 2nd Apr 2007 16:12 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

Maybe Iím just growing old and cynical, but I do wonder how much of this move is down to Apple's belief that DRM restricts users from /legal/ use on non-compliant hardware (especially given that Apple have spent time and money building their own DRM algorithms), and how much this move has to do with public image in the face of backlash against Vistas pro-DRM stance?

Either way, in my opinion itís a positive move. Iím just yet to be convinced about the motives behind it.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Cynical?
by milles21 on Mon 2nd Apr 2007 17:54 in reply to "Cynical?"
milles21 Member since:
2006-11-08

I think it is self serving but however self-serving it is still a good move for the consumers. So if someone gives a billion dollars for their personaly ego to help cancer patience the end result is the sufferers still benefit.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Cynical?
by MollyC on Mon 2nd Apr 2007 18:15 in reply to "Cynical?"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

"Maybe Iím just growing old and cynical, but I do wonder how much of this move is down to Apple's belief that DRM restricts users from /legal/ use on non-compliant hardware (especially given that Apple have spent time and money building their own DRM algorithms), and how much this move has to do with public image in the face of backlash against Vistas pro-DRM stance?"

I doubt it has anything to do with Vista's DRM, since OSX Leopard is expected to implement that same DRM required to play protected BR and HD-DVD discs. Also, Jobs, as the largest single shareholder in Disney, hasn't made any effort (at least publicly) at getting Disney to release its movies on unprotected DVD, HD-DVD, and/or BR discs, or provide them in unprotected format online.

BTW, I have my doubts as to how well this is going to work. I think most buyers of iTMS music don't care about the DRM, because it rarely gets in the way of what they want to do. And the 259kbs is irrelevant, as iPods don't provide the fidelity that such a bitrate would make any difference (and most can't tell the difference anyway). I don't think many consumers will pay $1.29 for a single song.

Edit: (Yes, I'm editing this as I post. :p) On second thought, since the songs are DRM free, a group of friends could split the $1.29 among themselves, and create a copy amongst themselves (I assume this is "legal"? Or is there some EULA that forbids copying; that would be in tune with Apple's software - no copy protection (e.g. activation, etc), but there's still a EULA that prevents copying from being legal - I'm rambling now. :p)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Cynical?
by Laurence on Mon 2nd Apr 2007 18:26 in reply to "RE: Cynical?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

On second thought, since the songs are DRM free, a group of friends could split the $1.29 among themselves, and create a copy amongst themselves (I assume this is "legal"? Or is there some EULA that forbids copying; that would be in tune with Apple's software - no copy protection (e.g. activation, etc), but there's still a EULA that prevents copying from being legal - I'm rambling now. :p)


theoretically they could, but that would be breaching copywrite law

Edited 2007-04-02 18:29

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Cynical?
by shykid on Tue 3rd Apr 2007 06:28 in reply to "RE: Cynical?"
shykid Member since:
2007-02-22

I'm quite cynical about this, too, but I am also sort of happy about it. It's baby steps to defeating DRM. When I look at this, plus the backlash and lack of lawsuit successes the RIAA has been having lately, I think the music industry is in for some major changes.

Personally, I wouldn't purchase anything from the iTunes music store unless it was DRM-free for regular price--when I purchase music, I want to buy music, not DRM to babysit me. It should not cost extra to purchase something the way it should have been to start with.

DRM does very little to actually stop piracy; it's just a headache, even if merely a theoretical headache to most. To me, it's just the sentiment of being treated like a criminal that keeps me away, but I suppose I am weird and one-in-a-million for that.

Edited 2007-04-03 06:33

Reply Parent Score: 1