Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 13th Jun 2007 10:38 UTC, submitted by Nixomayor
GNU, GPL, Open Source Linux leader Linus Torvalds has finally found something that could convince him that the forthcoming version 3 of the General Public License is worth adopting: open-source Solaris. "If Sun really is going to release OpenSolaris under GPL 3, that may be a good reason" to move Linux to the new license, Torvalds said in a posting to the Linux kernel mailing list on Monday. "I don't think the GPL 3 is as good a license as 2, but on the other hand, I'm pragmatic, and if we can avoid having two kernels with two different licenses and the friction that causes, I at least see the reason for GPLv3."
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bedo
Member since:
2006-01-03

unless the software is using glibc which is under LGPL. but that may change, so future glibc will be under GPLv3. and any software using glibc cannot run under linux kernel.

Reply Parent Score: 1

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Where did you hear that glibc would be relicensed under GPLv3?

Reply Parent Score: 3

PRaabjerg Member since:
2006-09-23

Actually, he may be right about that... HOWEVER, if that is to happen, it will be done with a GPLv3 with added permissions to make it functionally equivalent to the LGPL. I believe there were musings about constructing a sort of "new LGPL" that way.

I fairly often see people who appear to underestimate the FSF a bit. The FSF may have strong principles and ideology, but that doesn't mean they're stupid. They compromise, they are realistic, and often practical about what they do.
They're quite aware that making the GNU stack incompatible with the Linux kernel (either legally or technically) is probably on the list of the "10 most stupid things the FSF could do". Likewise is putting glibc under a pure GPLv3 licence (thus forcing all code compiled using glibc to become GPLv3. Cool in theory, but a really stupid move in practice).

Reply Parent Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
unless the software is using glibc which is under LGPL. but that may change, so future glibc will be under GPLv3. and any software using glibc cannot run under linux kernel.
"""

No. "system software", software which may generally be expected to exist on a particular platform, is exempted. Otherwise, you wouldn't be able to run GPL software on Windows, etc.

I think that the Linux kernel and glibc both qualify as "system software" on most Linux systems. :-)

Edited 2007-06-13 18:19

Reply Parent Score: 2