Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 15th May 2008 17:59 UTC, submitted by TLZ_
Qt There is a group of consistency freaks out there (like myself) who are not very fond of mixing Gtk+ with Qt applications. The reasons for this are not just graphical, but also behavioural; Gtk+ applications behave differently than Qt applications (menus are different, layout is different, etc.). Trolltech obviously can't tackle the behavioural side of this issue, but they can tackle the graphical one. This is exactly where QGtkStyle comes into play.
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maybe not so helpful?
by ari-free on Thu 15th May 2008 21:13 UTC
ari-free
Member since:
2007-01-22

I dunno...if everything looks the same but acts differently then you'd be even more confused.

Reply Score: 2

RE: maybe not so helpful?
by Doc Pain on Thu 15th May 2008 22:48 in reply to "maybe not so helpful?"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

I dunno...if everything looks the same but acts differently then you'd be even more confused.


I can follow this idea, that's why I think the article's description contains the passage "The reasons for this are not just graphical, but also behavioural; Gtk+ applications behave differently than Qt applications (menus are different, layout is different, etc.)."

And just image that Gtk2 and Qt are just the two most common GUI toolkits today. Just consider Tcl/Tk, Gtk1, or even Xaw. They do look very different and behave "strange", too. But when you're familiar with a desktop system that uses many different applications with different toolkits (such as mine does), this isn't a problem. Really.

Only consistency enforders may think different. :-) But after all, I really welcome an easy approach to make at least Gtk2 and Qt applications to look consistent. This will make Linux and UNIX desktop solutions more appealing to users who insist on having everything in the same look.

Reply Parent Score: 2