Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Jun 2008 20:23 UTC, submitted by Mark Wielaard
Internet & Networking While the history of wireless computer networks dates back to the 1970 with the University of Hawaii's ALOHAnet (I wish we retained that name instead of 802.11x), it has only been during the past, say, 10 years that the technology started to make serious inroads into the consumer market - your home. The latest and greatest variant is 802.11n, and while promoted as the best thing since sliced bread, Frank Ohlhorst has his reservations, and debunks 5 myths concerning 802.11n.
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RE: Scare Mongering
by protagonist on Fri 20th Jun 2008 03:51 UTC in reply to "Scare Mongering"
protagonist
Member since:
2005-07-06

"I'll tell you the biggest security risk for end users; its people who have either stupid passwords or unsecure wireless networks. All these can be solved with selecting from a drop down box in the router configuration; WPA2 plus a decent password. "

Then this article by Bruce Schneier will probably take you by surprise.

http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Scare Mongering
by kaiwai on Fri 20th Jun 2008 10:10 in reply to "RE: Scare Mongering"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Then this article by Bruce Schneier will probably take you by surprise.

http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2...


He does raise an interesting issue; and it was actually raised in a court case a few months ago; whether one is liable if one fails to secure ones own wireless point. For me, I don't expect there to be a 'perfect' security solution, but if WPA2 makes life a little more difficult, then it'll keep my network safe from almost all hackers trying to log onto it.

With that being said, there is only one other router I've ever detected in my area - so I'm pretty safe; it isn't as though I'm sitting in the CDB or something.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Hackers don't care about your network. Criminals and skript kiddies may take interest but Hackers have there own hardware and ethics without distinguishing hat colours or falling into the single definition the media likes to sell news papers with.

I know, it's a small symantec point but some feel it's still an important distinction without needing to use hat colours or other cute subtitles. We also shouldn't need to distinquish between breaking and entering or thieft just because it involves a computer tool instead of a crowbar; criminal intent is criminal intent without needing the media buzzwords.

Reply Parent Score: 2