Linked by David Adams on Sun 5th Oct 2008 03:18 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless A Fortune Magazine article looks at hand-held computing's most beleaguered major player and wonders whether it wouldn't be better off hitching its wagon to Google's coat-tails and adopting Android. After shunting aside its own, old-and-creaky OS in favor of Microsoft's it's been hanging its hopes on a long-awaited new Linux-based OS. Android may be Palm's best bet to avoid stemming its inexorable slide into irrelevance.
Thread beginning with comment 332441
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: No
by g2devi on Sun 5th Oct 2008 12:48 UTC in reply to "No"
g2devi
Member since:
2005-07-09

I don't get it either. With Android, you're required a Google account, and you're required to use GMail and other G-services. We railed against MS-Passport, but when Google tries the same thing, "it's a good thing" for some reason. No thanks. Maemo is likely a far better choice for Palm. Someone has to cater to the non-groupie locked in (i.e. iPhone and Android) crowd.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: No
by unoengborg on Sun 5th Oct 2008 13:21 in reply to "RE: No"
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't get it either. With Android, you're required a Google account, and you're required to use GMail and other G-services. We railed against MS-Passport, but when Google tries the same thing, "it's a good thing" for some reason. No thanks. Maemo is likely a far better choice for Palm. Someone has to cater to the non-groupie locked in (i.e. iPhone and Android) crowd.



Last time I looked there was no requirement in using Google services with Android. We can expect that it will come with components that makes it easy to use such services, but that's hardly surprising.


Android is built to be modular, so a reasonably good developer should be able to extend or even replace even standard components of Android, so if you don't like G-mail you can even write you own mail system. My guess is that we will see a lot of e-mail, calendaring plugins in the market, once the handsets becomes a little more common.

This is nothing like the Microsoft passport thing.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: No
by elsewhere on Tue 7th Oct 2008 04:20 in reply to "RE[2]: No"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Last time I looked there was no requirement in using Google services with Android. We can expect that it will come with components that makes it easy to use such services, but that's hardly surprising.


The requirement will come from the incentives google will likely provide to the telcos and the handset manufacturers. These companies see Mozilla making $50M a year from Google, and they'll want a piece as well.

Android is built to be modular, so a reasonably good developer should be able to extend or even replace even standard components of Android, so if you don't like G-mail you can even write you own mail system. My guess is that we will see a lot of e-mail, calendaring plugins in the market, once the handsets becomes a little more common.


Depending upon whether or not the handset manufacturers, or providers, allow that level of modification. Just because Android is open source, doesn't mean it has to be implemented in a way that enables it to be modifiable or customizable.

Google, the handset manufacturers, and the telcos, are all investing money in making this thing viable. I'll admit I'm cynical, but I'd find it hard to believe that they're making this investment so that users have total freedom in choice.

This is nothing like the Microsoft passport thing.


It is, but it's just much more subtle. Google isn't doing this just for warm and fuzzy feelings.

At the end of the day, it remains to be seen how many android phones actually appear on the market, and how customizable they will be, and how the telcos will handle it, and what type of arrangements Google makes with the providers. It's speculation until then, even on my part, since the first phone hasn't even hit the market yet.

But I consider it a no-win battle to choose between Microsoft, Google or Apple for owning my phone.

Just my 2c...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: No
by AndrewDubya on Sun 5th Oct 2008 16:26 in reply to "RE: No"
AndrewDubya Member since:
2006-10-15

It's becoming just as mainstream to hate Google as it is to hate Microsoft. Actually, it's worse than that. People seem to think Microsoft is small now and they can't do any harm, which I think is amazingly short-sighted. Microsoft is still the major company doing whatever it can to lock people in to proprietary formats to prevent competition.

It's safe to ignore comments that Maemo doesn't have phone support. I'm sure it will soon enough. My problem with Maemo is that it's just not that clean, and this coming from someone who really loves his N810. All of the apps that really "work" on the n810 use insanely customized UIs. I still hold out hope for it... I don't think there is plenty of work that can be done with Maemo to make it better, without sacrificing too much backwards compatibility.

But, on that note, I really think people are using other biases to assume Android will be bad. I'm looking forward to getting an Android-based phone (maybe not the G1 though), and I'm sure I'll be able to use it in addition to my N810 if that proves to be useful.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: No
by KAMiKAZOW on Sun 5th Oct 2008 17:11 in reply to "RE[2]: No"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

It's becoming just as mainstream to hate Google as it is to hate Microsoft.

What? Look at digg (a site more mainstream that OSNews). If you post some criticism about Google there (like Google's habit of collecting personal data), you'll get modded down.
At least among the tech crowd, Google and Android are more popular than Jesus.

Reply Parent Score: 2