Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Dec 2008 23:47 UTC, submitted by shaneco
Microsoft The month of December has already been unkind to Microsoft. The software giant's Windows operating system and its Internet Explorer browser saw significant market share drops reported on back-to-back days. Not only was the November percentage drop for Windows the biggest in two years, but Windows market share dipped below a number where it has historically held tight: 90 percent. According to Web metrics company, Net Applications, Windows market share as of Dec. 1 is 89.6 percent. Meanwhile, Mac OS X posted its largest gain in two years, with 8.9 percent market share at the end of November.
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Those 10% 'ers ain't coming back
by zaine_ridling on Thu 4th Dec 2008 04:59 UTC
zaine_ridling
Member since:
2007-05-13

Here's the open secret we all know through experience: once a windows user crosses over to Linux of mac, they don't go back. So that 10% will slowly increase over the next decade.

Remember, the tipping point for Firefox to make an unprecedented impact on the market was not much more than that.

Reply Score: 2

jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

Here's the open secret we all know through experience: once a windows user crosses over to Linux of mac, they don't go back. So that 10% will slowly increase over the next decade.


Really. I was a Linux-only user for three years or so and I'm back using Windows again, with no plans of changing my mind for now. Not that this means much in the big scheme of things, of course, but at least it tells that it's not always the case.

Reply Parent Score: 6

REM2000 Member since:
2006-07-25

I don't think he meant 100% of people switching switch for good, he obviously meant generally, which in my experience is true of a great many apps aswell as the OS. OpenOffice, Firefox, Thunderbird etc.. Many people switch and generally stay on the other platforms as they offer a lot more.

Of course in an ideal work Windows, MacOS and Linux would each have a 3rd of the market share, this of course is great news that finally the market share is beginning to change for the better and finally we can get back to having a big open computing arena where many companies compete with good ideas and good products, the 80's was the last time there was a level playing field and it was anybodies game.

As it has been said before by Apple, Microsoft doesn't have to disappear or go out of business for others to succeed, there is enough of a market for everyone.

Reply Parent Score: 7

christianhgross Member since:
2005-11-15

I can completely understand... Though I think this time it is different. Not with Linux mind you. I mean with OSX. OSX has really gathered market share and mind share.

I mean what does Apple do? Build a notebook that has an operating system that actually allows you to do simple things, like, scan, print, etc, etc...

Yes, Yes I heard, its the "evil driver people" who are not playing ball. Hmmm, maybe because Linux people are cheapskates!

I like Open Source, but money has to fit into the equation because otherwise I go hungry. And as we have seen services are not it (a'la Redhat, or Novell).

What I think is a real game changer is the iPhone and its app stores. By pricing most things in the 1 to 5 USD dollar range you have taken Microsoft's playbook and shredded it and put Apple's name on it. That was a brilliant move...

Reply Parent Score: 2

zombie process Member since:
2005-07-08

While I believe that most people who use an alternative OS for that period of time probably don't "go back," I don't agree by any means that most people who switch stay either. In my own experience, very few people are willing to deal with the hassle of learning something new - even those who have alternative OS tech support at their fingertips. Better the devil you know, I guess.

Reply Parent Score: 2

graigsmith Member since:
2006-04-05

i used linux as my home desktop exclusively for 2 years, and i then switched back to windows. i was convinced vista was going to be horrible, but when i actually tried it, it's very nice. i now use vista.

Reply Parent Score: 2

cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

"Here's the open secret we all know through experience: once a windows user crosses over to Linux of mac, they don't go back. So that 10% will slowly increase over the next decade.


Really. I was a Linux-only user for three years or so and I'm back using Windows again, with no plans of changing my mind for now. Not that this means much in the big scheme of things, of course, but at least it tells that it's not always the case.
"

That's all well and good but why do you use Windows? Is there some software package you can't run on Linux? Does your work require your use of Windows for various reasons? Were you too lazy (or stubborn) to learn Linux well enough to make it your mainstay? My point is that many people switch to Linux only to switch back to Windows for reasons beyond their own control.

Reply Parent Score: 2

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Really. I was a Linux-only user for three years or so and I'm back using Windows again, with no plans of changing my mind for now. Not that this means much in the big scheme of things, of course, but at least it tells that it's not always the case.

Same here... but that was back around 1999 or 2000, when I tried Red Hat Desktop 8 or 9 (or whatever). Linux has come a long way since then.

In 2004 I found DistroWatch and got curious about Linux again (I had no idea what a "distro" was back then, let alone the fact that there are so many choices). Getting tired of Microsoft's ways and XP's looming death as well as the crap Microsoft was pulling with Vista, I gave it another look, and by late 2005 or sometime in 2006, I was switched.

I currently don't have a single Windows partition on this machine (removed all those and started fresh a while back). I have switched distros a few times, though. I can't foresee myself ever switching back completely to Windows (just not gonna happen). Windows has moved down from my main OS to "toy" status, and I rarely use it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

I ran Linux only for several years between 2002 and 2005. Then I built a new computer system and put XP-64 on it. It's now running Vista Ultimate x64.

I needed a system to play games and do .NET development on, and I felt I was getting too far out of touch with the current state of Windows. So I switched back.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Coral Snake Member since:
2005-07-07

Actually I Just went back to Windows too because I had to get a new computer. Rather than putting Linux into it (because I'm on dial up and all my CD distros are out of date) i decided to give the Windows Vista Home Premium OS that came with it a spin and I THOUGHT I WAS STILL RUNNING LINUX.

As a forinstance I play with the command line a lot and in vista with the exception of the old fashion C:> prompt the console ran just like the Konsole app under KDE in my old Mandrake distro even to the point of being able to use the arrow keys to go back to previous stored commands and erasing mistakes in t command from anywhare in it.

THe basic Windows Vista system was also essentially multi user like Linux too with an Administrator who is the only one who could install software and run certain kinds of software and unpriveleged users who could just use software after it was installed.

Even Internet explorer has gotten up to the Linux/MacOS-X times and now supports tabbed Browsing.

So I still think we will have a monopoly in Computing
Not of a single OS manufacturer anymore but of a single OS design. Windows is now Multi User and supports a powerful Command line and Tabbed Browsing,
with a powerful "Eye Candy" desktop environment. OS-X is based on the BSD and the Apple desktop which is Multi User and supports a powerful command line and Tabed Browsing with a powerful "Eye Candy" desktop.
and Finally Linux has always had a Multi User system and supported tabbed browsing in TWO "Eye Candy" desktop environments (KDE and GNOME).

Basically what all this ammounts to is all the popular OSs are now exactly alike.

Reply Parent Score: 1

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

My experience says otherwise, I have known quite a few people who have switched to Linux and switched back, due to lack of applications they need(or think they need), or the inability to diagnose or fix something. Some of those people I convinced to give it a try, but when an update hoses X, for example, they tend to get cranky.

I think a lot more switchers stick with OS X, but I know a couple of people who switched to Macs 5 or 6 years ago and have switched back.

Reply Parent Score: 2