Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Feb 2009 18:31 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives Back when it was becoming clear that the time of the BeOS had come and gone, enthusiasts immediately set up the OpenBeOS project, an attempt to recreate the Be operating system from scratch, using a MIT-like license. The project faced difficult odds, and numerous times progress seemed quite slow. Still, persistence pays off, and the first alpha release is drawing ever closer. We decided to take a look at where Haiku currently stands.
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RE[2]: But why?
by Greuceanu on Wed 11th Feb 2009 13:28 UTC in reply to "RE: But why?"
Greuceanu
Member since:
2007-09-27

* less than 10-sec boot time
No one really cares about this since no one really resets his computer 10-20 times a day to see the difference.

* no lagging, no latency in user interactions
Linux/Vista feel fast on Core2 Duo with 4GB of RAM... MacOS X is fast too.

* small hardware requirements, small footprint on CPU and RAM usage, very light HDD usage (both OS and other software are very small)
(Some) Linux distroes? (Slackware, Zenwalk, but there are more).

* easy to use and efficient GUI yet still appealing
Any OS with KDE?

* never crashes, eventually part of the OS crashes but you just need to restart this part, not the whole OS -- same for device drivers installation, just restart some part of the OS, do not reboot the whole computer
Again, Linux?

* easiest software distribution model (in my opinion): no enforced package manager, no unmaintanable registry base, just unzip where you want and it works
MacOS, maybe Linux?

* virtual desktops with independent resolutions
Besides multiple monitors, who need independent resolutions for different virtual desktops?
Again, any KDE/GNOME based Linux has irtual dekstops. Even MacOS, nowadays.

* real shell (bash) with all the power of UNIX (including easy scripting)
Uhm, Linux?

* powerful and efficient file-system
Linux? OpenSolaris?

* well documented and well defined stable API
I'm not a programmer, so I won't digg into this.

That translator stuff are really nice, I haven't heard about them until now.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: But why?
by dragossh on Wed 11th Feb 2009 14:34 in reply to "RE[2]: But why?"
dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

No one really cares about this since no one really resets his computer 10-20 times a day to see the difference.
Notebooks? Also, that 10-second boot time is great for netbooks.

Linux/Vista feel fast on Core2 Duo with 4GB of RAM... MacOS X is fast too.
With *4GB* of RAM, and they only *feel* fast? Try Haiku on a 7-year old machine with 256MB of RAM.

(Some) Linux distroes? (Slackware, Zenwalk, but there are more).
Until you run some heavy apps. All BeOS apps open quickly and run fast.

Any OS with KDE?
This is subjective. IMHO, KDE is not easy to use.

Again, Linux?
Wake me up when I can update or replace the whole networking system, media kit, desktop environment and still not logout/reboot.

MacOS, maybe Linux?
Linux? Package managers.
OS X does it exactly like BeOS, except using .zip files.

Besides multiple monitors, who need independent resolutions for different virtual desktops?
Web developers? I want to see how my site looks on different resolutions and color depths without going all the time into the Display preference pane.

Filesystem: I agree here, ZFS is great.
API: Cocoa & BeAPI are probabily the best APIs out there.
Translators: I can't understand why noone has copied this already. We're in 2009, and we're still focusing on *programs that open formats*, instead of just file types.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: But why?
by izomiac on Thu 12th Feb 2009 02:22 in reply to "RE[2]: But why?"
izomiac Member since:
2006-07-26

No one really cares about this since no one really resets his computer 10-20 times a day to see the difference.
Sure it matters, I'd be pretty pissed if my TV took 2 minutes to start up, and I rarely use it. Different expectations and all. OTOH, people that reboot 10 times a day tend to be dual booting... which I think is the target audience for now (that and VMs).

Linux/Vista feel fast on Core2 Duo with 4GB of RAM... MacOS X is fast too.
I'm using the Windows 7 beta, and while nicer than Vista, it's still an order of magnitude slower than the BeOS or Haiku. If you're just comparing Linux, MacOS, and Windows then you lack a good point of comparison.

* easiest software distribution model...
MacOS, maybe Linux?

Meh, different strokes for different folks. Personally, I hate the way Linux does that... "ipkg install package-3.2452.123.1"... Ok, looks like it worked... now what just happened, and where did the executable go?

Besides multiple monitors, who need independent resolutions for different virtual desktops?
Web developers, people that prefer working at a lower than maximum resolution for most day-to-day stuff...

Uhm, Linux?
Ya know, just because Haiku exists doesn't mean you have to stop using Linux. Also, OSes borrow features from each other all the time. And competition is a good thing.

* powerful and efficient file-system
Linux? OpenSolaris?

Having is not the same as using. Tracker queries have been a major feature of the BeOS for a long time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: But why?
by renox on Thu 12th Feb 2009 06:37 in reply to "RE[2]: But why?"
renox Member since:
2005-07-06

* less than 10-sec boot time
No one really cares about this since no one really resets his computer 10-20 times a day to see the difference.


Curious: whenever there's a discussion about whatever improvement in boot time, usually the following discussion contains *a lot* of messages: people do care about fast boot time.

* no lagging, no latency in user interactions Linux/Vista feel fast on Core2 Duo with 4GB of RAM... MacOS X is fast too.

1) So this means that to have a fast desktop on a laptop you have a battery life measured in seconds?
2) No everybody is rich: think about the OLPC..

As for the rest, I agree with you, BeOS is no more superior to the competition on these points.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: But why?
by Vanders on Thu 12th Feb 2009 11:30 in reply to "RE[2]: But why?"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

* powerful and efficient file-system
Linux? OpenSolaris?


Linux and Solaris have some great filesystems (XFS, ZFS) but until user-space catches up with them and actually starts to make use of the advanced features they offer, you may as well be running ext3 for all the difference it makes to the user.

The interesting thing about BeFS (& AFS, which I have to mention of course) isn't just that they support neat features such as arbitrary meta-data streams, it's that the user space and applications have been designed to take advantage of that support.

Reply Parent Score: 6