Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 1st Mar 2009 17:26 UTC, submitted by kaiwai
Hardware, Embedded Systems Long-time OSNews reader Kaiwai has written down his experiences with his Acer Aspire One, Linux, and Windows. He concludes: "After a hectic few weeks trying to get Linux to work, I am back to square one again - a netbook running Windows XP SP3 as it was provided by Acer when I purchased it. I gave three different distributions a chance to prove themselves. I expected all three distributions to wipe the floor with Windows XP - after all, these are the latest and greatest distributions the Linux world have to offer. There has been at least 7 years since the release of Windows XP for Linux to catch up to Windows XP and from my experience with Linux on this said device - it has failed to step up to the plate when it was needed."
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eeepc 1000h running ubuntu jaunty alfa
by nyarnon on Sun 1st Mar 2009 19:40 UTC
nyarnon
Member since:
2009-01-26

Title says all maybe you are better off using XP untill you gain the knowledge needed tp compare both systems.

Just to elaborate. I run Ubuntu Jaunty Alfa on my Asus 1000h netbook that is completely original except for a memory expansion to 2 giga. Jaunty even as a alfa version runs stable enough. But if the alfa would get broke, I can fall back anytime to a Ubuntu Intrepid stable release that I have ready on a USB key just incase. On Jaunty all hardware is supported out of the box. For intrepid I use a special eee kernel by http://www.array.org/ubuntu/.

I know that acer has a problem with the wifi. This can be solved by compiling the apropriate driver you need. For the rest there should be no real problem at all.

Reply Score: 1

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Again, you miss the point. You people always miss the point. Compiling the driver shouldn't be necessary, it's 2009 for crying out loud. Do you comprehend this? If someone wanted to try Linux on their Aspire One and they were new to it, how comfortable do you think they're going to be dropping to the command-line to compile a stupid driver? What if the driver doesn't, for some odd reason or unsuspected configuration, compile? Then what, the user is screwed, and you just say "works for me" and tell them to rtfm?
Even for those of us very experienced in Linux, as I am, it's still bloody annoying to still, after thirteen odd years in my case, have to deal with compiling drivers. An end user's system should not need a compiler installed. Period. Once the Linux community grasps that fact, perhaps then they'll understand the ultimate goal that needs to be achieve--full desktop useability, without the need to even know what source code is because, you see, Joe User doesn't give a damn.

Reply Parent Score: 6

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

If someone wanted to try Linux on their Aspire One and they were new to it, how comfortable do you think they're going to be dropping to the command-line to compile a stupid driver? What if the driver doesn't, for some odd reason or unsuspected configuration, compile? Then what, the user is screwed, and you just say "works for me" and tell them to rtfm?

This I do agree with. It's silly how you can't just go and find a precompiled driver but you instead have to compile them all by hand.

Why not implement some rather stable binary API which gets changed only when there is an actual need for that and the kernel version bumps up as a side-effect? That way you could just check that "Oh, my kernel supports drivers compiled for 2.7. Neat, I'll go and download those." No, you have to either use distribution supplied ones or compile the drivers every single time some even the slightest minor thing gets updated.

The "stable binary API" wouldn't even have to have a very large set of functionality, just as long as it'd allow for most simple drivers to get by. And being "stable" doesn't mean it couldn't change. Just not have it change every week just for the heck of changing it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

mrguitarmann Member since:
2009-01-28

I have an Aspire One running Ubuntu Jaunty. Why are you compiling drivers? You need to add *one* line to *one* file.

One Line:
blacklist acer_wmi

One File:
/etc/modprobe.d/blacklist

Reboot and you're in. And baring in mind this is alpha I'm willing to bet it's fixed by release.

Also, note Windows 7 on an Aspire One installs the WRONG driver (5007 instead of 5006) and leaves you with no wireless. In Beta.

What does this tell you about progress of the two OS's?

Reply Parent Score: 1