Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th May 2009 22:04 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Many Linux users have experience with Wine, the application compatibility layer which allows some Windows programs to run on UNIX-like machines. During Ubuntu's Open Week event, Mark Shuttleworth was asked about Wine, and how important he believes it is for the success of Ubuntu.
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ephracis
Member since:
2007-09-23

That may or may not be the case, but the Linux applications mentioned in this thread actually DO answer all of the criticisms you have so far voiced in this thread. Your criticism of Linux desktop applications is out of date.

That very much makes it sound like you are just trying to come up with criticism of Linux applications for the sake of trying to be critical and negative.

For all of the use cases that you actually mentioned, Linux applications have an answer.

No, I actually tried to be very clear on that one.

Two things.

First: the reason why I did not use those programs on Linux for those very small tasks (nothing really complicated) was because I just can't get a hang around the applications. I don't find them easy to use. Highly subjective, a very personal opinion. (also, if you would read my post further down you would know that I don't mix Qt apps in a Gnome environment, so I am more interested in GTK-based applications).

However, my other point was that for more complex tasks nothing still beats the applications from Adobe.

And why would I try to be negative when I do my absolutely, very best to point out that I have total faith in that it will be fixed in a near future. It's not like I am saying that Linux sucks and it cannot be fixed. I guess this is the downside of textual conversations.

Edited 2009-05-06 04:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I don't find them easy to use. Highly subjective, a very personal opinion. (also, if you would read my post further down you would know that I don't mix Qt apps in a Gnome environment, so I am more interested in GTK-based applications).


Very strange.

Mixing Qt apps in a Gnome environment may not work very well, I don't really know, but mixing GTK-based applications in a KDE4 environment works just fine. I posted an illustration of this on this thread earlier.

As for ease of use ... didn't you just say that you don't run Qt-based apps? Well in that case, how would you even know if you find these best-of-breed KDE4 apps easy to use or not?

However, my other point was that for more complex tasks nothing still beats the applications from Adobe.


You haven't yet been able to point out exactly why you say that (the feature lists of digikam and kdenlive are quite decent after all, and both applications are easily as easy to use as any others in the same field) ... but I'll take you at your word. I'll grant you that you think that the applications from Adobe are better.

For 99% of the populace, the best-of-breed Linux applications are entirely good enough. More than good enough.

http://www.digikam.org/drupal/node/327
http://www.digikam.org/drupal/node/328
http://www.digikam.org/drupal/node/325
http://www.kdenlive.org/main-window

If you want to spend a fortune on Adobe applications, and force yourself to put up with a Windows environment on which to use them, then it is your money and your waste of resources so go right ahead.

I still don't see the point in your trying to put off the 99% of people, for whom the best-of-breed Linux applications are perfectly fine, with made up and out-of-date criticisms of Linux desktop applications however.

Unless you have another agenda.

Edited 2009-05-06 05:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Oh, of course. If you dare to criticize the all mighty Linux desktop from a point of view that is not acceptable to someone else, you have an agenda. How silly of me to forget. Working overtime on your conspiracies there, Lemur 2?
Everyone has a right to criticize and, even when you present your side and they still do not agree, they have a right to hold that opinion. Ah well... just know, attitudes like yours do more to drive interested parties away from foss than a lot of other factors.
Seriously, are you against free speech or allowing others to hold opinions? If not, you might want to tone down your accusations... just a friendly hint, but the way you often comport yourself, whether you mean to or not, comes across as arrogant, condescending, and overzealous. Relax,... not everyone will agree with you, nor should they. We're not clones, you know.
Now, as for Wine itself... I'm one of those who doesn't really see much point. Sure, you can run that occasional Windows app if the app works, but why? Why make Linux or any other os simply another platform to run Windows applications? I'm of the opinion--and I'll stress that this is just an opinion--that all the time spend in developing Wine could have been better spent developing well thought out, native applications instead of providing a way to run Windows programs... It just doesn't really make sense to me. The foss desktop will never be here if everyone's solution ends up being Wine... if that happens, we all might just as well start developing and using reactos and have done with it.

Reply Parent Score: 2